USI Alumni And Friends Trip To Explore Magnificent Cities of Central & Eastern Europe

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare USI Alumni And Friends Trip To Explore Magnificent Cities of Central & Eastern EuropeUniversity of Southern Indiana alumni, their families, and the general public are invited to explore Magnificent Cities of Central & Eastern Europe 2017. The trip, part of the Alumni Travel Program offered through the USI Alumni Association, is set for June 17 – 30 2017, and registration is still open for a limited time.Participants will experience the local cultures of Germany, the Czech Republic, Austria, Hungary and Poland as this 14-day tour explores the Central and Eastern European cities of Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Krakow and Warsaw.  Tour Berlin, Germany’s capital city, a city rich in history and home to Charlottenburg Palace, Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, Schoenberg City Hall, Kurfuerstendam and the Reichstag Building. Visit the fairy-tale city of Prague, tour the remarkable Hradcany Castle, Old New Synagogue, Old Town Squire with its Astronomical Clock and the haunting St. Vitus Cathedral. Enjoy Vienna’s architectural marvels, including the lavish Schoenbrunn Palace and the summer retreat of the Habsburg dynasty. Discover Krakow’s historic Old Town on a city tour featuring stops at the Market Square, St. Mary’s Church and Wawel Castle, a former residence of Polish kings.Other highlights of the trip include taking a poignant journey through history at the camps of Auschwitz, time to explore the capital of Saxony, the lovely town of Dresden on the banks of the River Elbe, famous art galleries, museums and a Mozart concert. Experience the moving history of Warsaw, both joyous and tragic, as you travel through the capital city of Poland.The “Magnificent European Cities” tour, booked through Collette Vacations and Lifestyle Tours, will depart from Evansville Regional Airport. Cost from Evansville is $4,969 per person, double occupancy, plus taxes. Proceeds from alumni travel fund scholarships for USI students.For more information, contact USI Alumni and Volunteer Services at 812-464-1924, [email protected] or visit https://gateway.gocollette.com/link/736088.  To make a reservation, contact Ken Meyer or Tracy Wilson at Lifestyle Tours by phone at 812-682-4477. Space is limited.last_img read more

DR RICHARD MOSS WILL RUN FOR CONGRESS IN REPUBLICAN PRIMARY

first_imgDr. Richard Moss of Jasper, Indiana has announced that he will seek the nomination for Congress for the 8th Congressional district in the May 3, 2016 Republican primary.  He believes that Republican leadership in Washington has strayed from the voters that sent them there.Dr. Moss is a board certified specialist in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (Ear Nose and Throat). He earned his undergraduate degree in Biology at Indiana University, and completed his Doctor of Medicine degree at the I.U. School of Medicine in Indianapolis. Moss has been in private practice since 1991 with offices in Jasper and Washington for over 20 years.  He previously had offices in Paoli, Tell City, and Huntingburg.  He is one of the original investors in the St. Thomas Surgery Center in Jasper.  He is a member of the Indiana State Medical Association and a fellow of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.Between 1987 and 1990, Dr. Moss traveled extensively throughout Asia, serving as a visiting surgeon on a voluntary basis at major medical centers in Thailand, Nepal, India, and Bangladesh. Although he received little or no compensation during these three years, he considers them among the most rewarding periods of his life.  He continues his volunteer work and extensive travel with his family around the world today.  Dr. Moss gives multi-media presentations and slide shows of his travels and work overseas at local schools and churches.Dr. Moss has written a regular conservative column for the Dubois County Herald for more than ten years. He has written also for the Indianapolis Star, the Evansville Courier and Press, the Bloomington Herald-Times, the Petersburg Press Dispatch, and the Ferdinand News. He maintains a conservative blog (exodusmd.com) and has recently authored a memoir about his mother (Matilda’s Triumph).  He continues to write political columns that are distributed through his book signings and speaking engagements and often published. He is completing a second book about his life as a traveling cancer surgeon in Asia in hopes of promoting better understanding of the challenges of poverty, neglect, and advanced disease in the developing world. He also seeks to cultivate an appreciation of the excellent healthcare we enjoy here in the states and the freedom and opportunities that America uniquely provides.  Dr. Moss also founded and owned the Bronx Bagel, a bagel shop and deli in Jasper.He has been married to his wife, Supit (“Ying”), for 26 years.  Supit was a nurse whom he met while working in Thailand.  She now assists him in his office.  They are proud parents of four children, Arielle (23), Noah (21), Adina (12), and Isaiah (11). Arielle is a recent graduate of I.U. Bloomington and winner of a Fulbright Scholarship to teach in Morocco where she now resides. Noah is currently studying Business Management at I.U. Bloomington. Adina and Isaiah attend Jasper Middle School.  All of the children play multiple musical instruments and perform regularly. Dr. Moss eagerly attends their many recitals, competitions, and performances and is actively engaged in the education and rearing of his children.Dr. Moss and his family regularly participate in interfaith activities with local churches including a local food bank. They are members of the Temple Adath B’nai Israel (a synagogue) in Evansville.Dr. Moss seeks office because of profound concerns over the direction of the country.  He feels that both parties have failed the American people.  He believes firmly that new leadership is required if the nation is to correct itself.Find out more about Dr. Moss at www.rmoss4congress.com.  Call or email at 812-684-0971 or [email protected] take time and vote in today’s “Readers Poll”. Don’t miss reading today’s Feature articles because they are always an interesting read. Please scroll at the bottom of our paper so you can enjoy our creative political cartoons. Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without our permissionFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Detailed guide: NHS Test and Trace: how it works

first_imgThe government has published the COVID-19 response – spring 2021 setting out the roadmap out of the current lockdown for England. This explains how restrictions will be eased over time. Isolate:as soon as you experience coronavirus symptoms, medical advice is clear: you must self-isolate for at least 10 days. Your isolation period includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th. You may also find this stay at home illustration useful. Anyone else in your household must self-isolate for 10 days from when you started having symptoms. This includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. Other people in your household can now get a test if they do not have symptoms. Read further guidance on getting a free test. England is still in a national lockdown. You must stay at home, leaving only where permitted by law, and follow the rules in this guidance. NHS Test and Trace: ensures that anyone who develops symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) can quickly be tested to find out if they have the virus, and also includes targeted asymptomatic testing of NHS and social care staff and care home residents helps trace close recent contacts of anyone who tests positive for coronavirus and, if necessary, notifies them that they must self-isolate at home to help stop the spread of the virus Isolate: you will be told to begin self-isolation for 10 days from your last contact with the person who has tested positive. It’s really important to do this even if you don’t feel unwell because you could still be infectious to others. Your isolation period includes the date of your last contact with them and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your last contact with them was at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th. Failure to self-isolate for the full time period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000. Your household doesn’t need to self-isolate with you, if you do not have symptoms, but they must take extra care to follow the guidance on social distancing and handwashing and avoid contact with you at home. having face-to-face contact with someone less than 1 metre away (this will include times where you have worn a face covering or a face mask) having been within 2 metres of someone for more than 15 minutes (either as a one-off contact, or added up together over one day) travelling in a car or other small vehicle with someone (even on a short journey) or close to them on a plane What we will ask youWe will ask you: ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to us (for example, those starting 09 or 087) ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product of any kind ask for any details about your bank account ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone disclose any of your personal or medical information to your contacts provide medical advice on the treatment of any potential coronavirus symptoms ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS Universal Credit Working Tax Credits income-related Employment and Support Allowance income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance Income Support Pension Credit Housing Benefit Pharmacies will not be able to deliver your medicines unless you provide them with your unique contact tracing reference number. you have been asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace you are employed or self-employed you cannot work from home and will lose income as a result you are receiving at least one of the following benefits: Part 2: if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace because you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus Customer logs and NHS QR codesContinued opening up of the economy and public services is reliant on NHS Test and Trace being used to minimise transmission of the virus. In order to ensure that businesses and local services are able to remain open, we will be mandating that organisations in designated sectors must: Support for people who are self-isolatingWe will direct you to your local authority helpline if you need the following during the period of self-isolation: if you develop symptoms, you must continue to follow the rules to self-isolate with other members of your household and get a test to find out if you have coronavirus if you test positive for coronavirus, you must share information promptly and accurately about your recent contacts through NHS Test and Trace to help us alert other people who may need to self-isolate if you have had close recent contact with someone who has coronavirus, you must self-isolate if NHS Test and Trace advises you to do so if you are returning from travel abroad it is important to check whether you need to self-isolate call you from 0300 013 5000. Local contact tracers will contact you from a local council number. If you’re unsure if this is genuine, please contact your local council for advice send you text messages from ‘NHStracing’ ask you to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact-tracing website ask for your full name to confirm your identity, and postcode to offer support while self-isolating ask about the coronavirus symptoms you have been experiencing ask you to provide the name, telephone number and/or email address of anyone you have had close contact with in the 2 days prior to your symptoms starting ask if anyone you have been in contact with is under 18 or lives outside of England Test: get a free NHS test immediately to check if you have coronavirus or call 119 if you have no internet access. We have introduced this service to help return life more to normal, in a way that is safe and protects our NHS and social care. The service allows us to trace the spread of the virus and isolate new infections and play a vital role in giving us early warning if the virus is increasing again, locally or nationally.How NHS Test and Trace helps fight the virusNHS Test and Trace will help to control the rate of reproduction (R), reduce the spread of the infection and save lives. By playing your part through the actions set out below, you will directly help to contain the virus by reducing its spread. This means that, thanks to your efforts, we will be able to go as far as it is safe to go in easing lockdown measures.Playing your part: If you don’t have access to the internet, you can get a test by phoning 119.Our guidance on testing has more information on our testing programme.If you test negativeIf you get a negative test result, this means you are at low risk of having coronavirus.Other members of your household can stop self-isolating. If you feel well and no longer have symptoms similar to coronavirus, you can stop self-isolating. You could still have another virus, such as a cold or flu – in which case it is still best to avoid contact with other people until you are better.If you test positiveIf you get a positive test result, this means that when you took the test, you had coronavirus. You – and other members of your household – must continue to self-isolate.Health and care workersIf you work in a health or care setting, you should follow the separate guidance for health and care workers on testing and when to return to work.Telling people about your test resultIf you develop symptoms, you may wish to alert the people with whom you have had close contact over the last 2 days. You should tell them that you might have coronavirus but are waiting for a test result.At this stage (until the test result is known), those people do not need to self-isolate, but they should take extra care in practising social distancing and good hygiene, like washing their hands regularly. They should also watch out for their own symptoms.You may want to write down your recent close contacts now so that you have them to hand if you test positive.Sharing information about your recent contactsIf you get a positive test, we will contact you and ask you to share information about any close contacts you had just before or after you developed symptoms. This is vital if we are to stop the spread of the virus.We will contact you by text message, email or phone. If you are under 18 years old, we will contact you by phone wherever possible and ask for your parent or guardian’s permission to continue the call.You will be sent a link to the NHS Test and Trace website and asked to create a confidential account where you can record details about your recent close contacts. If you do not have internet access or if you don’t complete the online process, one of our contact tracers will phone you to gather this information from you.The information you give will be handled in strict confidence and will only be kept and used in line with data protection laws. It will help us to contact people who are at risk of having been exposed to coronavirus and explain what they must do to help prevent the further spread of the virus.Some local authorities have their own contact tracing teams who are employed by the local council. NHS Test and Trace may pass your details to these local teams if you have tested positive for coronavirus and they have not been able to contact you for 24 hours. These teams work with local public health experts and will usually contact you by phone and text. In certain circumstances they may visit you at your home to ask you to make further contact with them or to ask about your contacts.When we contact people to advise them to self-isolate, we do not tell them your identity. But if you have alerted them when you first develop symptoms or when you get your test result, they will be better prepared for the advice we give them.When we contact youIf NHS Test and Trace contacts you, the service will use text messages, email or phone.All texts or emails will ask you to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact-tracing website.If NHS Test and Trace calls you by phone, the service will be using the phone number 0300 013 5000.All information you provide to NHS Test and Trace is held in strict confidence and will only be kept and used in line with the Data Protection Act 2018.Contact tracers will: We will ask you to provide, where possible, the names and contact details (for example, email address, telephone number) for the people you have had close contact with. As with your own details these will be held in strict confidence and will be kept and used only in line with data protection laws.If NHS Test and Trace identify you as a contact and you work in a critical service where the recommendation for you to self-isolate would have impact on providing that critical service, your employer will need to escalate this to the local health protection team (HPT) for a risk-assessment.How this information is usedBased on the information you provide, we will assess whether we need to alert your contacts and ask them to self-isolate.We may refer the case to local public health experts if your case is complex, for example, if you work in or have recently visited: Share contacts: if you test positive for coronavirus, NHS Test and Trace will send you a text or email alert or call you with instructions of how to share details of people with whom you have had close, recent contact and places you have visited. It is important that you respond quickly and accurately so that we can give appropriate advice to those who need it. You will be told to do this online via a secure website or you will be called by one of our contract tracers. If NHS Test and Trace contact tracers are unable to contact you for 24 hours, they may pass your case to your local authority to follow up by phone or in person. Test if needed: if you develop symptoms of coronavirus, other members of your household must self-isolate immediately at home for 10 days and you must get a test to check if you have coronavirus or call 119 if you have no internet access. Other people in your household can now get a test if they do not have symptoms. Read the further guidance on getting a free test. You and your household’s isolation period includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th. If your test is positive, you must continue to stay at home for at least 10 days and we will get in touch to ask about your contacts since they must self-isolate. If your test is negative, you must still complete your 10-day self-isolation period because the virus may not be detectable yet – this is crucial to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. You may find this stay at home illustration useful.center_img Results: if your test is positive, you must complete the remainder of your 10-day self-isolation. Anyone in your household must also complete self-isolation for 10 days from when you started having symptoms. Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000. If your test is negative you will no longer be required to self-isolate, though you may wish to do so if you still feel unwell and have symptoms similar to coronavirus. If your test is negative, other household members no longer need to self-isolate. For more information, read the further guidance on symptoms.If you have one or more of these symptoms, you must self-isolate straight away for 10 days – or longer if you still have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell/taste. Your isolation period includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th.If you live in the same household as someone with coronavirus symptoms, you must self-isolate straight away for 10 days. This includes the day their symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your 10 day isolation period starts on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 hrs on the 25th.You may find this stay at home illustration useful.You can now get a test if you do not have symptoms. Read the further guidance on getting a free test.Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000.How to get a testAnyone with symptoms can get a coronavirus test, whatever their age. practical or social support for yourself support for someone you care for financial support How the rules changed on 29 MarchSome of the rules on what you can and cannot do changed on 29 March. However, many restrictions remain in place. Find out what you can and cannot do. if you work in – or have recently visited – a setting with other people (for example, a GP surgery, a school or a workplace). The use of face masks and other forms PPE does not exclude somebody from being considered a close contact, unless they are providing direct care with patients or residents in a health and care setting This is so you can access the local support available to you, like help delivering food or with other practical tasks. You may also be able to get help from the NHS volunteer responders.The NHS volunteer responders programme remains active and support can be accessed by calling 0808 196 3646. For more details, visit the NHS volunteer responders programme.If you’re unable to collect your prescription medication because you’re self-isolating, a free medicines delivery service is available. First, you should ask if any friends, family or volunteers can collect medicines for you. If friends and family are not able to collect your medicines for you, and you or the pharmacy are unable to arrange for a volunteer through the NHS volunteer responders programme, then you will be eligible for free medicines delivery.Contact your pharmacy to tell them that you’re self-isolating and need your medicines delivered, and they will arrange this free of charge. a health or care setting, such as a hospital or care home a prison or other secure setting a school for people with special needs critical national infrastructure or areas vital for national security when NHS Test and Trace has been unable to contact you after an agreed amount of time and your local authority has set up a system to take over your case Employers should support workers who are told to self-isolate and must not ask them to attend work. See the guidance on the NHS Test and Trace service for employers, businesses and workers. If you are in employment, speak to your employer to discuss if you can work from home or other options are available during your period of isolation.Workers in self-isolation are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) for every day they are in isolation, as long as they meet the eligibility conditions. Guidance has been produced for employees that are unable to work because they are self-isolating.NHS Test and Trace will provide evidence that someone has been told to self-isolate. This evidence can be shared with an employer or education provider. Get an isolation note if you need evidence that you’ve been told to self-isolate.You may be entitled to a one-off payment of £500 through the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme if you are required to stay at home and self-isolate. You should go to your local authority’s website for more information. You will be eligible if you live in England and meet all the following criteria: call you from 0300 013 5000 send you text messages from ‘NHS’ ask for your full name and date of birth to confirm your identity, and postcode to offer support while self-isolating ask if you are experiencing any coronavirus symptoms provide advice on what you must do as you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus Local public health experts are Public Health England staff and teams employed by your local authority who work together with all parts of the local community to prevent or respond to local outbreaks.Part 2: people who have had close contact with someone who has coronavirusThis section applies to those who have been identified by NHS Test and Trace as a close contact.If you are told to self-isolateIf we identify you as someone who has had close recent contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus, we will notify you that you must self-isolate in line with medical advice and the law.It is a legal requirement to self-isolate if you are identified as a contact and told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace. Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000.You may be feeling well and not have any symptoms, but it is still essential for you to follow the advice that you are given.This is because, if you have been infected, you could be infectious to others. Some people infected with the virus don’t show any symptoms at all and it is therefore crucial to self-isolate to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.You can now get a test if they do not have symptoms. Read the further guidance on getting a free test. If you choose to get a test, you must continue to self-isolate, even if your result is negative. This is because even if you don’t have symptoms, you could still pass the infection on to others.How you will be told to self-isolateIf you are aged 18 or over, we will contact you by text message or email but will follow up by phone if we don’t get a response. If we only have a landline number for you, we will contact you on that number.If you are under 18 years old, we will contact you by phone wherever possible and ask for consent from your parent or guardian to continue the call.If you have internet access, we will ask you to log onto the NHS Test and Trace website. This is the simplest way of giving you the information you need and the opportunity to ask any questions. The online service will also ask you to confirm that you are following the advice on self-isolation.If you do not have internet access, we will arrange for a trained call handler to speak to you by phone to give you the information and advice you need.What happens nextYou must self-isolate for 10 days after you were in contact with the person who has tested positive for coronavirus. This is crucial to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus and failure to do so can result in a fine, starting from £1,000. Your isolation period includes the date of your last contact with them and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your last contact with them was at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th.Self-isolation means staying at home and not going outside your home at any time. If you live with other people, they do not need to self-isolate, but they should avoid contact with you as far as possible and follow advice on hygiene. If you do not live with other people, you should seek help from others, or delivery services, for essential activities such as food shopping. Self-isolation can be particularly challenging if you are looking after children, or if you care for vulnerable people who cannot stay with friends or family.If you go on to develop symptoms, anyone you live with must then self-isolate and you must report your symptoms and get tested.It is crucial that you complete your 10-day self-isolation period if you’ve been identified as a contact, even if you get a negative test result. This is because you may have the virus, but it cannot yet be detected by a test, so you could unknowingly spread the virus if you leave the house. Other members of your household, however, do not need to remain in self-isolation.When we contact youIf NHS Test and Trace contacts you, the service will use text messages, email or phone.All texts or emails will ask you to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact-tracing website.If NHS Test and Trace calls you by phone, the service will be using the phone number 0300 013 5000.All information you provide to NHS Test and Trace is held in strict confidence and will only be kept and used in line with the Data Protection Act 2018.Contact tracers will: This specific guidance applies in England only. All 4 administrations are working closely together to have a consistent and joined-up approach to testing and tracing.Definitions‘Self-isolation if you have symptoms’ means you and all household members must remain at home. Do not go outside your home for any reason, that is to work, school or public areas, and do not use public transport or taxis. The guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection page has more information on self-isolation.‘Contact’ means a person who has been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus and who may or may not live with them.It is a legal requirement to self-isolate if you test positive for COVID-19 or if you are identified as a contact and told to self-isolate by Test and Trace. Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000.How NHS Test and Trace worksPart 1: for someone with symptoms of coronavirus Contact tracers will never: if you have family members or other household members living with you. In line with the medical advice they must remain in self-isolation for the rest of the 10-day period from when your symptoms began if you have had any close contact with anyone other than members of your household. We are interested in the 2 days before you developed symptoms and the time since you developed symptoms. Close contact means: ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to us (for example, those starting 09 or 087) ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product or any kind ask for any details about your bank account ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone disclose any of your personal or medical information to your contacts provide medical advice on the treatment of any potential coronavirus symptoms ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS The NHS COVID-19 appThe new NHS COVID-19 app, now available to download for free in England and Wales, is the fastest way to see if you’re at risk from coronavirus. The faster you know, the quicker you can alert and protect your loved ones and community.The app has a number of tools to protect you, including contact tracing, local area alerts and venue check-in. It uses proven technology from Apple and Google, designed to protect every user’s privacy.Part 1: people who develop symptoms of coronavirusThis section applies if you have symptoms of coronavirus or you have received a positive test result.When to self-isolateThe medical advice is clear: you must self-isolate if you have coronavirus symptoms or live in the same household as somebody who does. The main symptoms of coronavirus are: Contact tracers will never: Alert: you will be alerted by NHS Test and Trace if you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. The alert will usually come by text, email or phone call. You should then log on to the NHS Test and Trace website, which is normally the easiest way for you and the service to communicate with each other – but, if not, a trained call handler will talk you through what you must do. Under-18s will get a phone call and a parent or guardian will be asked to give permission for the call to continue In addition, the hospitality sector will be required to ensure that anyone visiting pubs, restaurants and other venues provides their contact information or checks in using the official NHS QR code before being allowed entry to the venue.Any designated venue that is found not to be compliant with these regulations will be subject to financial penalties. It is vital that relevant venues comply with these regulations to help keep people safe, and to keep businesses open.Designated venues will need to keep records of customers, visitors and staff for a period of 21 days and make them available when requested by NHS Test and Trace or local public health officials to help contain clusters or outbreaks.Find out more about the requirements around maintaining these records. high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature) new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual) loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you’ve noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal ask at least one member of every party of customers or visitors (up to 6 people) to provide their name and contact details keep a record of all staff working on their premises and shift times on a given day and their contact details keep these records of customers, visitors and staff for 21 days and provide data to NHS Test and Trace if requested display an official NHS QR code poster from 24 September 2020, so that customers and visitors can ‘check in’ using this option as an alternative to providing their contact details adhere to General Data Protection Regulations Get a coronavirus testlast_img read more

Notre Dame football’s 273 home game sellout streak to end Saturday

first_imgAnnie Smierciak | The Observer Fans watch the Notre Dame football game against the University of Michigan in the stadium on Sept. 1, 2018.The current streak is the second longest in NCAA history, per the Tribune. The only streak that is longer is the University of Nebraska’s run of 373 sellouts, which is still active.Athletics director Jack Swarbrick said the streak itself was not a priority for the University, but rather the environment that accompanies home games.“It was never sort of important to me to keep it alive, but I understand why other people thought so,” Swarbrick said in the Tribune article. “It’s a point of distinction to a lot of people and our fans. … For me it’s always been: What’s the stadium environment like? Are we creating a great environment for our team and for our student-athletes? That you can say it’s also sold out is sort of a byproduct of that.”According to the Tribune, the sell-out streak has teetered on the brink of termination several times in the last several seasons. The Tribune referred to “creative” efforts on the part of the University to keep it going. Group ticket sales helped rectify the issue, Swarbrick said.“Group sales were a big part of keeping the streak going, too,” he said. “We’d go to somebody who was ‘a friend of Notre Dame’ and say, ‘Gee, can you help us with this game? Can you buy 50 tickets and distribute them to your employees?’ That would be an example.”Generally, such situations arise late in the season — especially in November, the Tribune reported. In past years, when there was only one game in November, Notre Dame could focus on finding buyers for the extra seats. But with three November home games against middling opponents, such a strategy would have proved ineffective, the article said.Notre Dame’s national reach is another factor contributing to the end of the streak, Swarbrick said.“When we’d have one game, we could clearly focus on it,” Swarbrick said in the article. “This is a circumstance, where you’ve got games in consecutive weeks in mid to late November, and so you don’t have some of the same strategies available to you. … And because of the number of our fans that travel (a great) distance to the stadium, is just a challenge for us. It’s endemic to that schedule. And we knew it a year and a half ago, as we were looking forward, that you know what, that might be the time where the streak ends.”The Tribune reported there has been some consternation with recent policy changes regarding ticket pricing. The school recently abandoned a system whereby all ticket prices were standard, regardless of seat location and opponent. Swarbrick defended the change on the grounds that it was fair to consumers.“It was basically an equity argument,” he said in the article. “The person who sat high in the end zone and the person who sat on the 50-yard line shouldn’t pay the same amount. We wanted to discount and create a lower price for corner seats and upper seats, and adjust the premium seats in the other direction.”The November game problem is not a temporary issue, Swarbrick said.“You can say limit the home games in November, but then is that fair to your football team to make them travel so much at the end of a season?” he said in the article. “You’re balancing the competitive desire to put yourself in a position with the (College Football Playoff) versus the challenges of selling games.”The Irish take on the Midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy at 2:30 p.m. Saturday.Tags: Jack Swarbrick, Naval Academy, Notre Dame football, Notre Dame Stadium Notre Dame football’s home sell-out streak of 273 games will end this weekend as the Irish take on Navy.According to the South Bend Tribune, this Saturday will mark the first time since Thanksgiving Day 1973 that Notre Dame Stadium will not be sold out for a home football game.last_img read more

County Manufacturers Encouraged To Produce Supplies For Covid-19 Response

first_imgMGN ImageJAMESTOWN – In response to a shortage of products to respond to the COVID-19 crisis in New York State, Chautauqua County officials are encouraging local manufactures to lend a hand.Specifically, the Chautauqua Industrial Development Agency (CCIDA) are encouraging local health care professionals, schools of public health or medicine, and providers and manufacturers of Personal Protective Equipment products to come forward to support the state’s response.The CCIDA says the state will provide funding to companies and individuals who can provide the appropriate products, equipment, and personnel needed to address the epidemic.Companies that fulfill these requirements, as well as qualified healthcare personnel who wish to help in the cause, are encouraged to visit a newly setup webpage with more information. Companies are also encouraged to visit the CCIDA website to fill out a short questionnaire related to their manufacturing capabilities and/or needs, which will be shared with the state and will be used internally to create a data-base for potential “matchmaking” within the County and region.“The State is in need of health professionals and producers/manufacturers of personal protective equipment, including gloves, masks, and gowns,” said County Executive PJ Wendel. “We have been working with local businesses that may be able to shift production to these needed supplies and we encourage any companies that have the ability to produce any of the needed items to contact the state directly and to fill out a short questionnaire on the CCIDA website. Healthcare professionals are also being encouraged to contact the state.  If we can help facilitate that process or answer any questions, please contact the CCIDA office at (716) 661-8900.”Since last week, the County and CCIDA have been collaborating with various stakeholders throughout the County regarding this crisis, and have been fielding calls from businesses primarily pertaining to compliance with the state’s non-essential businesses limits.The CCIDA has also created a “COVID-19 Resources for Businesses” page on the above-mentioned website, where the most up-to-date information is being provided.Any comments or questions regarding this announcement should be addressed to Deputy County Executive for Economic Development/CCIDA Chief Executive Officer, Mark Geise, at [email protected] Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Macquarie investment unit looks to develop 20GW of renewable energy in next five years

first_imgMacquarie investment unit looks to develop 20GW of renewable energy in next five years FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享BusinessGreen:The Green Investment Group (GIG) is set to develop a massive 20GW pipeline of renewable energy projects over the next five years in a bid to drive the “full transition” to low carbon energy, the bank’s owners Macquarie announced today at Climate Week in New York.Macquarie did not confirm what kind of green energy projects GIG would be backing, although the investment vehicle has previously supported offshore wind and energy-from-waste plants in the UK and Europe.Macquarie’s CEO and managing director Shemara Wikramanayake said for the next tranche of investment around 4GW of capacity is set to be in developing countries where funding for climate projects is tougher to source. Many of the projects will be backed by corporate Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs), she said.Macquarie also this week announced it has joined the Climate Finance Leadership Initiative (CFLI), which sees bosses of major financial firms join with UN climate envoy Michael Bloomberg to consider how best to mobilise and scale private capital for climate solutions. Together CFLI members have promised to deploy $20bn of emerging market climate finance by 2025, and to work more closely with development banks to drive private capital into developing economies.In addition, GIG announced a new partnership with Bloomberg New Energy Finance to build a data-led tool that will assess the green impact of more than 40,000 wind and solar assets globally.More: Macquarie’s Green Investment Group promises 20GW renewable energy pipelinelast_img read more

Huntington School Concert Dedicated to Typhoon Victims

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A post-secondary school in Huntington will raise money Sunday during its winter concert for survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest storms ever recorded.Half of the proceeds from the concert will go to the U.S. Fund for UNICEF—a global relief and advocacy group, which has already started sending supplies to some of the most devastated areas in the Philippines. Concertgoers are also welcome to make their own donations, Mahanaim School said.Donations will help UNICEF gather water, food, life-saving medicine and emergency supplies that the group can send to Tacloban, Ormac and Roxas—three areas severely impacted by the monster storm, the school said.Some of the performances will be “dedicated to the undying spirit of the people in the Philippines,” the school said.The official death toll from the storm is now over 3,600 and more than 12,000 were injured.Sunday’s concert is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. The school is located at 300 Nassau Road, Huntington.last_img read more

Mission United Helps Veterans Reacclimate To Civilian Life

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Like many military veterans, Romann, who traveled the world while serving in the U.S. Navy, found transitioning to civilian life to be easier said than done after doing three tours over a decade.Helping him reacclimate to life as a married father of two young daughters was United Way of Long Island’s VetsBuild, a program that provides career training for veterans in the green construction industry. After graduating, he’s now flourishing as a program analyst with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs overseeing contracts and budgeting for the Long Island National Cemetery.“Because of this incredible training program, I gained the necessary technical and leadership skills needed to advance my career,” said Romann, who did not want his last name used. He added that it “helped change my life for the better.” VetsBuild is one of a suite of initiatives within Mission United, a signature program of the nonprofit United Way of Long Island, part of the worldwide network of the 132-year-old global nonprofit. And with more than 101,000 veterans on LI — home to the nation’s second largest veteran population — there is no shortage of need.Besides job training under VetsBuild, Mission United, through its partner agencies, provides key referrals to secure careers, vital case management services, and emergency military family assistance. Veterans also have access to resources 24/7 by calling 211.Romann’s success story is emblematic of what Mission United aims to achieve with its assistance. In recognition of his integrity, perseverance, and commitment to advancing his education and leadership skills, Romann won the 2019 John Kominicki Memorial Rising Star Scholarship. The scholarship recognizes an individual who, like Kominicki — a veteran and the Press’ late publisher emeritus — displays excellence in leadership and a zest for learning. To help support the cause, United Way of Long Island invites the public to participate in its 2019 Mission United Veterans Day T-Shirt campaign. Those who make a small contribution will receive a Mission United T-Shirt to wear on Veterans Day this Nov. 11.United Way of Long Island President and CEO Theresa A. Regnante said, “Together we can help more military families transitioning to civilian life.”For more information, visit unitedwayli.org/missionunitedlast_img read more

Royal & Sun set to take 25% Moorfield stake

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Detectives Investigating Double Homicide in Dearborn County

first_imgDearborn, County, In. — (UPDATE Monday, January 22.) Indiana State Police and U.S. marshals have two people in custody in connection with a double homicide near Aurora on Friday. The two suspects were apprehended in Pulaski, Kentucky over the weekend.Police found the bodies of a female and male in the 5000 block of Douglas Drive Friday night.*****************                        *****************                                 *****************Indiana State Police Detectives are investigating a double homicide after two victims were located in a Dearborn County residence yesterday evening, January 19, 2018.The investigation began when deputies from the Dearborn County Sheriff’s Department responded to 5033 Douglas Drive, Aurora, Indiana to check on the welfare of the people inside the home.  Upon entering the residence, the deputies located two victims who were deceased inside.Indiana State Police Detectives and Crime Scene Investigators were called to the scene to lead the investigation.  Evidence at the scene indicated that both victims (one male, one female) were victims of homicides.Autopsies on both victims is scheduled for tomorrow, January 21, 2018, in Hamilton County, Ohio.  The names of the victims will be released after their identities can be confirmed and their families have been notified.The investigation by Indiana State Police and Dearborn County Sheriff’s Department Detectives is ongoing at this time.  No more information is available at this time.Anyone with information about this investigation is urged to call the Indiana State Police, Versailles Post at (812) 689-5000.  Callers can remain anonymous.last_img read more