Sad farewell to ‘remarkable woman’ Julie-Anne

first_imgFacebook NewsLocal NewsSad farewell to ‘remarkable woman’ Julie-AnneBy admin – November 23, 2011 841 Linkedin Print Email LIMERICK is this week mourning a woman who worked tirelessly and used her singing talents to raise money for breast cancer. Julie-Anne Dineen was diagnosed with breast cancer more than three years ago and then became an ambassador for fundraising for the cause. She released her charity single “Do You Believe,” which reached no 1 in the Irish Singles Chart in March 2009, and topped the charts for a week. The proceeds went to the Symptomatic Breast Cancer unit at the Mid-Western Regional Hospital in Ireland, where Julie-Anne had just finished treatment for breast cancer.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up She was nominated for Limerick Person of the Year 2009 after the recording. She completed a tour of Limerick schools where she performed her chart topping song and worked to spread a cancer aware message. She followed her chart success with a Top 3 hit in Ireland, a cover of River Deep – Mountain High released in October 2009.Julie-Anne lived with her husband Dave and sons Sean (12) and Matty (8) in Corbally, and the family had just recently moved to their new home in Adare.With her husband and other friends and supporters, the former Bunratty singer raised thousands for the charity, organising events including the Limerick Jigs and Reels.John Galvin, who worked with the couple in fundraising, said Julie-Anne was “a remarkable woman. What she has done is indescribable, doing so much fundraising and so much good while she and Dave were raising their children. They are a remarkable family”.40 year old Julie-Anne passed away on Sunday last. She was buried after requiem mass in St Joseph’s Church this Wednesday morning.center_img Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleWine news including @FVDIE Christmas tasting and moreNext articleCharity near victim of refund scam adminlast_img read more

Investigations of meltwater refreezing and density variations in the snowpack and firn within the percolation zone of the Greenland ice sheet

first_imgThe mass balance of polythermal ice masses is critically dependent on the proportion of surface-generated meltwater that subsequently refreezes in the snowpack and firn. In order to quantify this effect and to characterize its spatial variability, we measured near-surface (26%, resulting in a 32% increase in net accumulation. This ‘seasonal densification’ increased at lower elevations, rising to 47% 10 km closer to the ice-sheet margin at 1860 m a. s. l. Density/depth profiles from nine sites within 1 km2 at ∼1945 m a.s.l. reveal complex stratigraphies that change over short spatial scales and seasonally. We conclude that estimates of mass-balance change cannot be calculated solely from observed changes in surface elevation, but that near-surface densification must also be considered. However, predicting spatial and temporal variations in densification may not be straightforward. Further, the development of complex firn-density profiles both masks discernible annual layers in the near-surface firn and ice stratigraphy and is likely to introduce error into radar-derived estimates of surface elevation.last_img read more

Notre Dame football’s 273 home game sellout streak to end Saturday

first_imgAnnie Smierciak | The Observer Fans watch the Notre Dame football game against the University of Michigan in the stadium on Sept. 1, 2018.The current streak is the second longest in NCAA history, per the Tribune. The only streak that is longer is the University of Nebraska’s run of 373 sellouts, which is still active.Athletics director Jack Swarbrick said the streak itself was not a priority for the University, but rather the environment that accompanies home games.“It was never sort of important to me to keep it alive, but I understand why other people thought so,” Swarbrick said in the Tribune article. “It’s a point of distinction to a lot of people and our fans. … For me it’s always been: What’s the stadium environment like? Are we creating a great environment for our team and for our student-athletes? That you can say it’s also sold out is sort of a byproduct of that.”According to the Tribune, the sell-out streak has teetered on the brink of termination several times in the last several seasons. The Tribune referred to “creative” efforts on the part of the University to keep it going. Group ticket sales helped rectify the issue, Swarbrick said.“Group sales were a big part of keeping the streak going, too,” he said. “We’d go to somebody who was ‘a friend of Notre Dame’ and say, ‘Gee, can you help us with this game? Can you buy 50 tickets and distribute them to your employees?’ That would be an example.”Generally, such situations arise late in the season — especially in November, the Tribune reported. In past years, when there was only one game in November, Notre Dame could focus on finding buyers for the extra seats. But with three November home games against middling opponents, such a strategy would have proved ineffective, the article said.Notre Dame’s national reach is another factor contributing to the end of the streak, Swarbrick said.“When we’d have one game, we could clearly focus on it,” Swarbrick said in the article. “This is a circumstance, where you’ve got games in consecutive weeks in mid to late November, and so you don’t have some of the same strategies available to you. … And because of the number of our fans that travel (a great) distance to the stadium, is just a challenge for us. It’s endemic to that schedule. And we knew it a year and a half ago, as we were looking forward, that you know what, that might be the time where the streak ends.”The Tribune reported there has been some consternation with recent policy changes regarding ticket pricing. The school recently abandoned a system whereby all ticket prices were standard, regardless of seat location and opponent. Swarbrick defended the change on the grounds that it was fair to consumers.“It was basically an equity argument,” he said in the article. “The person who sat high in the end zone and the person who sat on the 50-yard line shouldn’t pay the same amount. We wanted to discount and create a lower price for corner seats and upper seats, and adjust the premium seats in the other direction.”The November game problem is not a temporary issue, Swarbrick said.“You can say limit the home games in November, but then is that fair to your football team to make them travel so much at the end of a season?” he said in the article. “You’re balancing the competitive desire to put yourself in a position with the (College Football Playoff) versus the challenges of selling games.”The Irish take on the Midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy at 2:30 p.m. Saturday.Tags: Jack Swarbrick, Naval Academy, Notre Dame football, Notre Dame Stadium Notre Dame football’s home sell-out streak of 273 games will end this weekend as the Irish take on Navy.According to the South Bend Tribune, this Saturday will mark the first time since Thanksgiving Day 1973 that Notre Dame Stadium will not be sold out for a home football game.last_img read more