Unattached Youth Encouraged to Register for Skills-Based Programmes

first_img Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, has called on unattached youth living in Zones of Special Operations (ZOSOs) to register for skills-based programmes the Government is offering.Speaking with young people during a tour of the ZOSO in Denham Town, Kingston, to “ascertain the ZOSO’s effect on children, students and youth in the area”, Mr. Reid said he wants to reach the unattached youth living in the community, especially those who need jobs and training.“Some of the social problems that we have in our society is lack of access to education and training, and we are bringing training to them or taking them from where they are to where the training is,” Mr. Reid told JIS News in an interview.“We are here for them. We’re going to take some training to them, and those we can take and place elsewhere, we’ll take [them],” he added.He said the ZOSO aims to bring about transformation, especially in the lives of inner-city youth, in which the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information is playing a pivotal role.“This is the beginning of a whole transformation for our inner-city communities, and we want to replicate this right across the country. The long-term development of Jamaica has to be built on training and education, access of quality education for all and meeting the needs of the people where they are,” Mr. Reid said.“I have a schedule to tour the ZOSO, because the strategy is [to] clear, hold and build, and part of the long-term building plan is to make sure that the education and training systems are available to the young people and, indeed, all the people of these communities,” he explained.One of the youth from Denham Town, whom Minister Reid said he was very concerned about, is former head boy of Vauxhall High School, Travis Morrison, who lives in Denham Town and is not enrolled in a programme or employed.“We’ve been able to meet individuals like Travis Morrison, who has over 20 subjects [including CSEC and CAPE]. I’m happy to tell him that we will try and get him into the Caribbean Maritime University based on the programme that they have,” Mr. Reid told JIS News.For his part, Travis said he was happy to meet the Minister and share his story with him.“I feel good and I am looking forward to the programme the Minister will enrol me in. I feel good that he came to hear our concerns and will try to help us,” Travis told JIS News.The Minister said skills-based programmes will not be forced on unattached youth; instead, members of the Ministry, along with other Government agencies such as HEART Trust/NTA, will be listening to the needs of the youth living in ZOSO areas, and enrolling them accordingly into programmes.“We are going to do our due diligence and surveys within the community to find out exactly what are their training needs. We’re not going to just prescribe but [also] look at their abilities, interests and take them up to the level we require, [and] we are going to make sure that the training is available,” he said. Story Highlights Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, has called on unattached youth living in Zones of Special Operations (ZOSOs) to register for skills-based programmes the Government is offering. He said the ZOSO aims to bring about transformation, especially in the lives of inner-city youth, in which the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information is playing a pivotal role. “Some of the social problems that we have in our society is lack of access to education and training, and we are bringing training to them or taking them from where they are to where the training is,” Mr. Reid told JIS News in an interview.last_img read more

Shanghai Dingheng Shipping on Chemical Tanker Ordering Spree

first_imgzoom China’s Shanghai Dingheng Shipping has embarked upon an ambitious investment campaign as it speeds up efforts to create a fleet of over 20 ships by the end of this year.Last week, the company inked a deal with Ningbo Xinle Shipbuilding Group on the construction of ten 9,000-tonne stainless steel chemical tankers. Dingheng added that it has reached a preliminary agreement with the shipyard on the construction of ten additional 6,000-tonne stainless steel chemical tankers.The delivery and financial terms of the two contracts have not been disclosed.“We will comprehensively optimize the design of this type of ships based on years of experience in practical use, apply domestic high-quality equipment as far as possible premised on keeping good general performance of ships, in an effort to create opportunities for and power the transformation and upgrading of related products in Chinese industry chain of chemical tankers,” the shipping company said.What is more, Dingheng and Ningbo Xinle Shipbuilding have also signed a 10-year bareboat charter agreement for 6 chemical tankers. These include three 7,500t coated chemical tankers, one 16,500t coated chemical tanker and two 13,200t new stainless steel chemical tankers, which will be delivered to Dingheng in the upcoming few months.In addition, the Shanghai-based shipping company, operating in Chinese coastal and international chemical transportation segment, has four 8,500t and two 13,000t chemical tankers under construction slated for delivery by the end of this year.last_img read more

Bruce Springsteen meets fans in Toronto to promote Born To Run

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Bruce Springsteen made a tour stop in Toronto on Thursday to meet fans and promote his new autobiography, Born to Run. Six hundred lucky fans who scored tickets to the sold-out event got the chance to have their photo taken with The Boss and get a copy of the memoir.Fans who didn’t act fast enough to get a ticket to the event in the Indigo store at Bay and Bloor Sts. were left disappointed. Twitterlast_img

Mikmaw artist brings Indigenous tattoo revival to Newfoundland with hope of reclaiming

first_imgJustin Brake APTN News Since the mid-1980s Mi’kmaw artist Jerry Evans has been using art to speak to his ancestry.Evans is an actor, filmmaker and powwow dancer – and now a traditional Indigenous tattoo artist.In the process, he’s helping others explore and express their identities as Indigenous peoples. Like many in Newfoundland, the attempted assimilation of Mi’kmaq people and erasure of Mi’kmaq culture had a profound impact on him and his family.“There was so much that was lost, that my artwork for me became a means to learn about who I was who my family is, who our people are here in this place,” he said.“I guess to a certain extent it still speaks to that, my artwork does.”The recent establishment of the Earthline Tattoo Collective in British Columbia presented Evans with a new opportunity.Following in the footsteps of friend and fellow Mi’kmaw artist Jordan Bennett, Evans was selected as one of six Indigenous artists for the collective’s tattoo training residency in Kelowna, B.C.Now he’s inking friends in the basement of his home in St. John’s, including people from Inuit, Mi’kmaq and Métis communities.That includes his friend Stephen George, who already has a tattoo of his great-grandmother on his left arm.On his right, a tattoo of his grandfather.“I wanted something to connect the two ancestors on either arm and what Jerry’s doing now is—I call it Tkaqamkuk, you know, which is Mi’kmaw for Newfoundland, Land over the water,” he said.“The jagged lines are the waves, and the straight line is the land. And the starburst in the middle, well, we’re the People of the Dawn, right? So where the sun first comes up. So it’s all there together.”Evans and George were both denied Indian Status and membership under the Qalipu Mi’kmaq band.But they said status is not what defines them as Mi’kmaq people.“There was different things, bureaucratic, administrative things, that were going on that were quite beyond genealogy or identity issues that make us who we are — cultural things, ceremonial things,” said George.“They can’t be captured in a piece of paper you send to the government.”For Evans, the tattooing and its importance to him and others isn’t something Canada can measure in defining Indigenous people.“It’s part of not just me reclaiming something that was denied our family,” he said. “But it’s something that was denied here in this place for most our people. And it’s a way to reclaim our traditions, our power, and I’m honoured to be able to do this.”[email protected]last_img read more