ND welcomes international students with orientation

first_imgJust a few days before the rest of the student body pours onto campus every August, incoming first-year students begin one of Notre Dame’s most renowned traditions: freshman orientation. For a few days, students participate in small-group bonding experiences and larger community events to welcome them to their dorm and the Notre Dame community at large. Even before this program takes place, however, another orientation is held: international student orientation.According to Rosemary Max, Director of International Programs for International Student and Scholar Affairs (ISSA), 380 international undergraduate and graduate students will be attending international student orientation this year, which is consistent with numbers in previous years.Max said international student orientation differs from regular orientation in more than a few ways.“Not only are we welcoming students to Notre Dame for the first time but often to the United States for the first time,” Max said. “Students are very far from home and in need of extra support. Also, international students learn about all of the immigration rules and regulations that are a part of their stay in the United States. It is a lot to take in for students who are new to the U.S.”Events including workshops on maintaining one’s immigration status, the American healthcare system and adjusting to American culture and classrooms took place Aug. 17 and 18.Max said that above all, she hopes that international student orientation will allow students to “feel welcome, to help them to make friends and to have them understand the great resources that are available to them on campus and in our community.” She said she considers it a valuable perspective for faculty, staff and fellow Notre Dame students to “appreciate the long journey these students have undertaken to come here both logistically and culturally and to give them a warm welcome to our campus.”“Certainly being in a place very far from home where everything is new — the language, climate, country, food — is a challenge,” Max said, “But international students are courageous and talented and they will be successful here at Notre Dame.”Max has also acted as a host mother to international students, including Fatou Thioune.Thioune, originally from Senegal, had dreamed of coming to the United States for her undergraduate education since she was a child. She said she wanted to “broaden [her] perspective beyond the French education system and to get a very good higher education in one of the world’s most renowned institutions.”“It became possible when I got the opportunity to study in an international school in South Africa where I got the opportunity to get into the English system and be fluent in the language,” Thioune said in an email. “I did not know much about Notre Dame before coming, because I couldn’t visit the school, and I didn’t know it growing up. But I chose it mainly because it is a Catholic institution and I attended three Catholic schools in Senegal and like the quality of education and their dedication to social service. I also decided to come because there are a few students from my high school here, so I already had a small community and a support system.”Now a junior, Thioune is able to look back and recall the anxiety Max described.“Coming to Notre Dame was my first time coming to the U.S., and my first time attending such a big school where I would be a minority,” Thioune said. “So I was anxious about every single aspect of my new life: social, academic, cultural. I was afraid I would not fit, that I would not make friends, that the new academic system would fail me, that I would face a severe culture shock, that I would be homesick for the next four years of my life and so on. I was afraid I would not be able to cope with all these challenges.”Thioune found that international student orientation helped assuage her fears when she arrived on campus.“International student orientation was a moment for me to let go of my anxiety by seeing so many people with whom I shared the same fears and confusion,” Thioune said. “Getting lost with other people, sharing the same thoughts, questions and concerns as other people, and most importantly, getting help and support from the International Ambassadors and the Notre Dame International office at large showed me that I wasn’t alone, that there were people I could relate to and people who would be there for me.”Thioune said international student orientation was her introduction into the community spirit of Notre Dame.“I particularly enjoyed meeting … the few students in our smaller group because that’s when I started knowing people on a personal level,” she said. “We did some icebreakers and from there, it was easy to just approach people and ramble about anything. That’s when I met my closest friend at Notre Dame now.”Thioune said she believes the success of international student orientation lies in its ability to create a “support system” comprised exclusively of international students who are all experiencing the same challenges and new encounters at the same time.“As much as freshman orientation offers the support as well, it doesn’t give much room for international students to ask questions and get answers about the simplest ways of life in the U.S., like why the bathroom doors are not closed off or how to get a phone plan,” Thioune said.As far as advice for incoming international students, Thioune said she simply encourages them to “seek help.”“People here are always willing to help, so you just have to go get that help,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to ask those questions about the simplest things ever, those simple things matter a lot to get adapted to the new way of life.”Thioune also recalled a piece of advice her host mother imparted on her upon her initial arrival to Notre Dame.“She told me that the key to having a great time in college is finding the right people for you,” Thioune said. “If you surround yourselves with the right people, you will feel comfortable, be inspired, have fun your own ways, resist peer pressure and, most importantly, make unforgettable memories. International orientation is an opportunity to find those right people for you. So [sieze] that opportunity and the many others coming.”Tags: Freshman Orientation 2016, international student orientation, International studentslast_img read more

Why Trump Would Almost Certainly Be Violating the Constitution If He Continues to Own His Businesses

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Richard Tofel, ProPublicaFar from ending with President-elect Trump’s announcement that he will separate himself from the management of his business empire, the constitutional debate about the meaning of the Emoluments Clause — and whether Trump will be violating it — is likely just beginning.That’s because the Emoluments Clause seems to bar Trump’s ownership of his business. It has little to do with his management of it. Trump’s tweets last month said he would be “completely out of business operations.”But unless Trump sells or gives his business to his children before taking office the Emoluments Clause would almost certainly be violated. Even if he does sell or give it away, any retained residual interest, or any sale payout based on the company’s results, would still give him a stake in its fortunes, again fairly clearly violating the Constitution.The Emoluments Clause bars U.S. officials, including the president, from receiving payments from foreign governments or foreign government entities unless the payments are specifically approved by Congress. As ProPublica and others have detailed, Trump’s business has ties with foreign government entities ranging from loans and leases with the Bank of China to what appear to be tax-supported hotel deals in India and elsewhere. The full extent of such ties remains unknown, and Trump has refused to disclose them, or to make public his tax returns, through which many such deals, if they exist, would be revealed. Foreign government investments in Trump entities would also be covered by the clause, as would foreign government officials paying to stay in Trump hotels, so long as Trump stands to share in the revenues.One misconception about the Emoluments Clause in early press coverage of it in the wake of Trump’s election is being clarified as scholars look more closely at the provision’s history. That was the suggestion that it would not be a violation for the Trump Organization to conduct business with foreign government entities if “fair market value” was received by the governments.This view had been attributed to Professor Richard Painter, a former official of the George W. Bush administration, and privately by some others. But Professor Laurence Tribe, the author of the leading treatise on constitutional law, and others said the Emoluments Clause was more sweeping, and mandated a ban on such dealings without congressional approval. Painter now largely agrees, telling ProPublica that no fair market value test would apply to the sale of services (specifically including hotel rooms), and such a test would apply only to the sale of goods. The Trump Organization mostly sells services, such as hotel stays, golf memberships, branding deals and management services.The Emoluments Clause appears in Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution. It bars any “person holding any office of profit or trust under” the United States from accepting any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign state” “without the consent of the Congress.” The word “emolument” comes from the Latin emolumentum, meaning profit or gain. The language of the clause was lifted in its entirety from the Articles of Confederation which established the structure of the government of the United States from 1781 until the ratification of the Constitution in 1788-89. The clause was derived from a Dutch rule dating to 1751.The clause was added to the draft Constitution at the Constitutional Convention on Aug. 23, 1787 on a motion by Charles Pinckney of South Carolina. As Gov. Edmund Randolph of Virginia explained to his state’s ratification convention in 1788, Pinckney’s motion was occasioned by Benjamin Franklin, who had been given a snuffbox, adorned with the royal portrait and encrusted with small diamonds, by Louis XVI while serving as the Continental Congress’s ambassador to France. As Randolph said,“An accident which actually happened, operated in producing the restriction. A box was presented to our ambassador by the king of our allies. It was thought proper, in order to exclude corruption and foreign influence, to prohibit any one in office from receiving emoluments from foreign states.”The Continental Congress in 1786 had consented, after a debate, to Franklin keeping the snuffbox, as it had earlier with a similar gift to envoy Arthur Lee. At the same time, consent also was given to diplomat John Jay receiving a horse from the King of Spain.The clause was part of the basis for Alexander Hamilton’s defense of the Constitution, in Federalist 22, as addressing “one of the weak sides of republics”: “that they afford too easy an inlet to foreign corruption.”There is no question that the Emoluments Clause applies to the president. President Obama’s counsel sought an opinion in 2009 on whether it barred him from accepting the Nobel Peace Prize. The Justice Department concluded that it did not, in part based on historical precedent (the Prize had also been awarded to Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, Vice President Charles Dawes and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger), but primarily because the Norwegian group that awards the prize was not deemed a governmental entity.The clause does not seem ever to have been interpreted by a court, but it has been the subject of a number of opinions, over the years, of the attorney general and the comptroller general.Nearly all of these opinions have concluded that the clause is definitive. In 1902, an attorney general’s opinion said it is “directed against every kind of influence by foreign governments upon officers of the United States.” In 1970, a comptroller general opinion declared that the clause’s “drafters intended the prohibition to have the broadest possible scope and applicability.” A 1994 Justice Department opinion said “the language of Emoluments Clause is both sweeping and unqualified.” Among the ties deemed to violate the clause was a Nuclear Regulatory Commission employee undertaking consultant work for a firm retained by the government of Mexico.Congress has passed one law giving blanket approval to a set of payments from foreign government entities. Known as the Foreign Gifts and Decorations Act, it is limited to gifts of “minimal value” (set as of 1981 at $100), educational scholarships and medical treatment, travel entirely outside the country “consistent with the interests of the United States,” or “when it appears that to refuse the gift would likely cause offense or embarrassment or otherwise adversely affect the foreign relations of the United States.” The specificity of these few exceptions reinforces the notion that other dealings with foreign government entities is forbidden without congressional approval.One attorney-general opinion from the Reagan administration offers the possibility of a more permissive interpretation of the Emoluments Clause, indicating it could be limited to “payments which have a potential of influencing or corrupting the recipient.” But whatever the meaning of this, it was the same Reagan Justice Department that banned the NRC employee from the Mexican-funded consultancy a year later.Ironically, an “originalist” reading of the clause — usually favored these days by conservatives as exemplified by the late Justice Antonin Scalia and current Justice Clarence Thomas — would seem to bind Trump more stringently, while a “living constitution” approach — exemplified by liberals such as the late Justices Louis Brandeis and Thurgood Marshall — might offer him greater latitude.Clearly, deciding what the Emoluments Clause means in a specific case is a complicated legal question. (The opinion on Obama’s acceptance of the Nobel Prize runs to 13 printed pages.) But just as clearly, the judges of its meaning with respect to President Trump will be politicians rather than the Supreme Court.The controversies that swirled around Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton established a number of key points. Among them are that the sole remedy for a violation of the Constitution by a president in office is impeachment, and that the House of Representatives is the sole judge of what constitutes an impeachable offense, while the Senate is the sole judge of whether such an alleged violation warrants removal from office. (Impeachments are very rare: articles of impeachment have been voted against only two presidents, Andrew Johnson and Clinton, both of whom were acquitted by the Senate, while Nixon resigned ahead of likely impeachment. Fifteen federal judges have also been impeached, and eight removed, while four resigned.)The arguments of scholars and lawyers on the meaning of the Emoluments Clause may influence the public, and their elected representatives. But if Trump decides not to dispose of his business, it will be up to Congress to decide whether to do anything about his apparent violation of the Constitution.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.last_img read more

Dodgers ride 5 straight two-out walks to another walk-off win over Diamondbacks

first_imgBy walking the lonely path to victory, the Dodgers became the first team in 15 years to win four consecutive home games in their final plate appearance.It wasn’t what the announced sellout crowd of 52,969 had in mind. Chris Taylor was down to an 0-and-2 count against Holland when the rally began. Taylor worked the count full, then walked on Holland’s sixth pitch. Russell Martin pinch hit for pitcher Yimi Garcia (1-2) and walked on seven pitches. Alex Verdugo walked on five pitches, loading the bases for Matt Beaty. He walked on four pitches, forcing in Taylor to tie the score 4-4.McFarland, a lefty, took over for Holland. Bellinger needed six pitches to win the game. He swung at one and fouled it off.“It’s hard to stay patient when there’s like that build-up and you can feel that tension,” Martin said. “Everybody wants to get the game-winning hit. But you have to hunt what you can do damage on. It’s that simple. You want to swing at good pitches. That’s kind of the name of the game.“But when the crowd gets going and you feel the energy build up, I think everything gets magnified,” Martin continued. “The crowd, you can feel them. They want you to swing. They want you to make something happen, but you’ve got to just know what you can do, stay within yourself, and I think everybody did that tonight.” How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start It was an unconventional ending to an unconventional win. The Dodgers (58-29) were out-hit by the Diamondbacks (43-44) by an 8-7 margin. They failed to cash in two chances with a runner on third base in the seventh inning, and two more chances with a runner on second base in the eighth inningUltimately, the Dodgers’ padded their 13-game lead over the second-place Rockies in the National League West. Other teams have hit more home runs, and hit for a higher batting average. But no National League club has drawn more walks in 2019 than the Dodgers (340).“We put on a clinic there in the ninth inning,” Manager Dave Roberts said. “(Taylor) was really sick today, and he came out and gave us two really great at-bats. That hustle triple (in the seventh inning) and then two outs in the ninth inning, just to grind out that at-bat, see pitches, earn a walk. … That was as good a display of keeping the line moving as we’ve seen.”The game began auspiciously. Arizona led 3-0 before the Dodgers scored their first run.With two outs in the first inning, starter Ross Stripling served up a single to David Peralta and an RBI double by Eduardo Escobar.In the second inning, Stripling walked Jake Lamb on five pitches, then hung a first-pitch slider to the next batter, Nick Ahmed. The resulting fly ball glanced off the top of the fence in dead center field, then carried over for a home run and a 3-0 lead.In the third inning, Stripling got one run back with his bat, driving in Edwin Rios with a line drive back up the middle – his second hit and his first RBI of the season. Rios jogged in from third base, bringing the Dodgers within 3-1.A more traditional method allowed the Dodgers to tie the score at 3-3. Diamondbacks pitcher Taylor Clarke walked Max Muncy to begin the fourth inning. His next pitch, a fastball down the middle to Kiké Hernandez, was ambushed. The ball sailed 388 feet to left field for a home run, Hernandez’s 14th this season.The score was still 3-3 in the fifth inning when Muncy made a diving stop on a ground ball to second base to record the inning’s first out.Then, with runners on first and third base, Stripling got the ground ball he needed from Adam Jones. Rios’ throw from third base to Muncy at second base was true. After stepping on the bag, however, Muncy threw the ball wide of first base, forcing Joc Pederson to dive and pull his foot off the bag. Jones was safe, Ketel Marte scored, and the Diamondbacks pulled ahead 4-3.Related Articles PreviousCody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after being walked with the bases loaded as teammate Russell Martin #55 scores the winning run to defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)A moment of silence for the Los Angeles Angels pitcher 27 year-old Tyler Skaggs who passed away on Monday prior to a MLB baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. 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(Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)David Peralta #6 of the Arizona Diamondbacks score on a single by teammate Eduardo Escobar (not pictured) against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Taylor Clarke #45 of the Arizona Diamondbacks throws to the plate against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers waits his turn at bat as he sits on the bat rack in the first inning of a MLB baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Nick Ahmed #13 of the Arizona Diamondbacks rounds third as he shakes third base coach Tony Perezchica #8 hand after hitting a two run home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the second inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Ross Stripling #68 of the Los Angeles Dodgers waits for the baseball after giving up a two run home run to Nick Ahmed of the Arizona Diamondbacks in the second inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Alex Verdugo #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers watches as Nick Ahmed (not pictured) of the Arizona Diamondbacks two run home run goes over the center field fence in the second inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. 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(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)The Dodgers’ Kike Hernandez (14) celebrates his two-run home run with manager Dave Roberts during the fourth inning of the team’s baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks Tuesday, July 2, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers dives for a single by Ketel Marte (not pictured) of the Arizona Diamondbacks in the fifth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles Dodgers won 5-4. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers dives for a single by Ketel Marte (not pictured) of the Arizona Diamondbacks in the fifth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles Dodgers won 5-4. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Greg Holland #56 of the Arizona Diamondbacks walks off the mound after walking the bases loaded and then the trying run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Greg Holland #56 of the Arizona Diamondbacks walks off the mound after walking the bases loaded and then the trying run against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger (35) is walked with the bases loaded for the last run of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the ninth inning Tuesday, July 2, 2019, in Los Angeles. Los Angeles won 5-4. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 02: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after his bases loaded walk, scoring Russell Martin #55 to win the game 5-4 over the Arizona Diamondbacks, during the ninth inning at Dodger Stadium on July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Russell Martin (55) scores the game-winning run when Cody Bellinger was walked with the bases loaded during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks on Tuesday, July 2, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after being walked with the bases loaded to defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Relieve pitcher T.J. McFarland #30 of the Arizona Diamondbacks walks off the field after giving up a walk with the bases loaded as the Los Angeles Dodgers defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 during a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Ketel Marte #4 of the Arizona Diamondbacks walks off the field as the Los Angeles Dodgers defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 during a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger is doused with sports drink after his bases-loaded walk in the ninth inning capped an unconventional 5-4 walk-off victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Tuesday night at Dodger Stadium. The Dodgers won the game with five consecutive two-out walks. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is doused with gatorade after walking with the bases loaded to defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JULY 02: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after a Gatorade shower in celebration of his bases loaded walk, scoring Russell Martin #55 to win the game 5-4 over the Arizona Diamondbacks, during the ninth inning at Dodger Stadium on July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after being walked with the bases loaded as teammate Russell Martin #55 scores the winning run to defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 40Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after being walked with the bases loaded as teammate Russell Martin #55 scores the winning run to defeat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4 in the ninth inning of a MLB baseball game at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)ExpandLOS ANGELES — Cody Bellinger hit four baseballs into the field of play Tuesday night, all 90 mph or harder off the bat. One resulted in a double play. Two resulted in fly-ball outs. The last resulted in a double despite four fielders stationed in the outfield, but he was stranded on second base.Finally, with the bases loaded and two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning of a tie game, Bellinger did what four men before him did to perfection: he waited. On a 1-and-2 count, Bellinger watched T.J. McFarland throw a changeup in the dirt, then a fastball headed straight for his hands, then another for ball four.Whoever coined the term “walk-off victory” probably didn’t have this scenario in mind, but they should have. The Dodgers drew five consecutive bases on balls – four against closer Greg Holland, then one against McFarland – to beat Arizona 5-4.“I had the opportunity to get hit the pitch before,” Bellinger said. “I don’t know why I didn’t lean into it. I could’ve leaned into it – not even, if I didn’t get out of the way I would’ve gotten hit. I was just trying to get on base any way I could.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Until the very end, Stripling was on the hook for the loss.“Today was probably the best I’ve thrown the ball all year, honestly, in my opinion,” he said. “Everything just felt strong and had a lot of finish to it.”Given a rough target of four innings and 60 pitches by Roberts before the game, Stripling pitched into the fifth inning and had 80 pitches on his ledger before Jones’ fateful ground ball. He settled for his second no-decision in as many starts, allowing four runs and seven hits in 4⅔ innings. He walked two batters and struck out seven.Stripling’s reaction to the game-ending sequence was a luxury few can afford: empathy.“As a pitcher, you feel for him,” Stripling said of Holland. “You don’t want anyone to really go through that. You want us to go out there and take it from him, not him basically hand it to us on a silver platter. You feel for him. He’s been one of the better closers in the game this year, and for a long time. I’m sure he’ll be able to get over it and get back at it. … That’s a tough feeling. The Diamondbacks played a really good game, then to lose it that way is probably a tough one to come back from.” Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco last_img read more