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Robert Jones on Wales, Dan Carter, Adam Jones and creativity

first_imgAt Llanelli, Phil Davies always used to say, ‘I expect you to make mistakes because if you’re not making mistakes, you’re not trying things’.I’d like Warren to give players a bit more room to express themselves.There were positives from the autumn. Our front five did fantastically well and Adam Jones has been at the cornerstone of that while second-rows Bradley Davies and Alun Wyn Jones were excellent. Sam Warburton only played two games but has proved that he has the physicality required, as has Dan Lydiate. Those two have shown we have depth in the back row.George North is a real find too. He’s got good stature and is so hungry for the ball; he’s always looking for opportunities. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Former Wales and Lions scrum-half Robert Jones says it’s all about wins, not good performances in defeat, for Wales.“The main feeling I’m left with after the autumn is one of disappointment as Wales failed to turn some reasonable performances into results. Wales have gone seven games without a win now. A good performance in defeat is no good at the World Cup – it’s all about winning.My main concern – and I’ve said this for the past 12 months – is our creativity in midfield and the back three. We now have as good a front five as we’ve ever had and we have a platform to demolish sides in the scrum, so it’s worrying that we can’t create a lot more from the set-piece.Shane Williams can always do something out of nothing and has individual flair, but we don’t create enough as a team. Players aren’t offering angles or running lines or giving decoy options, and at times we look pedestrian. We’re quite one-dimensional in attack and we need to have options A, B and C so that players can change things as they see it.The one thing I’d question Warren Gatland over is our ability to change and to give players more freedom. The attacking play sometimes looks premeditated and while there needs to be structure, there also has to be balance and variety.We don’t look up and play with our heads or our eyes; we don’t play what’s in front of us and see the space. Dan Carter constantly scans and looks at what’s in front of him. He may go through 12 phases of using forwards to hit it up but when the opportunity arises he’ll go up a gear and exploit the space he’s seen. That’s what New Zealand are so good at – they’re patient and then have the ability to be ruthless when the opportunities come.We need to be more inventive in our attacking approach – the lines we run and the options we offer – and it’s not a case of changing personnel but changing the mindset.center_img We’ve got a few players to come back from injury, so we should be in a better position to compete in the Six Nations. And we need to have a good Six Nations as this a tough season, with the World Cup a big carrot at the end of it.”Click here to see George North score two tries for Wales on his debutlast_img read more

Nigel Redman returns to Worcester as Forwards coach

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NEWPORT, UNITED KINGDOM – JUNE 10: Nigel Redman coach of England looks on ahead of the IRB Junior World Cup match between England and Canada at Rodney Parade on June 10, 2008 in Newport, Wales. (Photo by Hamish Blair/Getty Images) TAGS: Worcester Warriors Former England lock named new forwards coachWORCESTER WARRIORS is delighted to announce that former England lock Nigel Redman has today been appointed as the new Forwards Coach at Sixways and will return to the club for a second spell.Redman rejoins the Warriors, where he previously worked as Academy Manager, after leaving his position as Elite Coach Development Manager at the RFU that he has held since 2008.The former Bath lock left Sixways to become a National Academy Coach in 2004 and coached the national Under-21 and Under-19 teams before leading England Under-20 to a Six Nations Grand Slam and a Junior World Championship final in 2008.Since then he has worked with Head of Elite Coach Development Kevin Bowring to support the development of coaches in England teams, the National Academy, Premiership and Championship clubs, and academies.center_img Redman, an RFU Level 5 Coach and a graduate of the UK Sport Elite Coach Programme, links up with former Bath and England teammate Richard Hill. Redman also won 20 caps for England, making his debut when he was 19-years-old against Australia, and featured in two Rugby World Cups. He also represented the British & Irish Lions and captained them in South Africa in 1997 and has led the Barbarians.last_img read more

Pro’s playbook: Front lineout peel

first_imgWant to peel from the lineout like a satsuma enthusiast? Find out how in this Pro Playbook from the May  edition of Rugby World in which former Saracens favourite and current academy supremo Don Barrell gives you a dynamite front peel… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Download the PDF HERE, and take it to training.last_img

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_img Dominant Dominic: Waldouck played a big part in Newcastle’s win at Gloucester. (Photo: Getty Images) Leading man: Alun Wyn Jones runs out at the RDS for his 200th Ospreys match. (Photo: Inpho)Double centuryAlun Wyn Jones made his 200th appearance for the Ospreys on Friday evening but didn’t have a win to celebrate as Leinster beat them 31-19 at the RDS. Jones made his usual terrific contribution to the game with 13 tackles and eight carries, but Leinster were too good for the Ospreys on the day, building up a 31-0 lead with powerful and dynamic rugby. Johnny Sexton scored a try on his first appearance of the season, as well as kicking 11 points, while Man of the Match Josh van der Flier scored two tries.Dan Biggar produced a moment of magic for the Ospreys, passing behind his own back to Ashley Beck to change the point of attack and engineer a try for Ben John, then Sam Davies, playing at full-back, created the Ospreys’ final try for James King with a fine break and dummy. Flying wing: Ryan Edwards in mid air after a tackle by Ian Whitten. (Photo: Getty Images)Edwards leads the wayBristol had a tough task this week as they tried to recover from last week’s 70-22 hammering by Wasps, but with Exeter Chiefs the visitors to Ashton Gate, they were up against another classy side.They went 14-0 down with two tries by Olly Woodburn but scored a try of their own on 20 minutes thanks to the speed and confidence of right wing Ryan Edwards. Grubber and grabDanny Cipriani produced one of his magic moments to set up a try for Jimmy Gopperth during Wasps’ 20-15 win over Northampton at Franklin’s Gardens.The fly-half put in a delicate grubber kick to get behind the Saints’ defence, gathered the ball then offloaded out of the tackle to Guy Thompson, who scorched up the pitch before giving the scoring pass to Gopperth.Mike Ellery did the same thing for Saracens as they fought back from 17-0 down at Harlequins and created a try for Richard Wigglesworth early in the second half, but it wasn’t enough for Sarries to overhaul the hosts. Jackson scores a scorcherPaddy Jackson scored what is being touted as an early contender for Guinness Pro12 Try of the Season and helped Ulster beat Glasgow Warriors 22-17 at Scotstoun.It was only Glasgow’s second Pro12 defeat at home since November 2013 and they had been leading 17-15 as the final quarter began and Jackson struck.Ulster turned over the ball in their own 22, Louis Ludik made a jinking break, Ruan Pienaar shipped the ball swiftly on to Darren Cave and he passed it on to Jackson, who slid over the line despite the efforts of the defenders, then converted his own try. Costly errorsAlex Losowski has made a stunning start to the season for Saracens, slotting in at No 10 in the absence of Owen Farrell and proving a match-winner. However, he made a couple of errors in this weekend’s 17-10 loss to Harlequins, starting when his pass to Alex Goode in the fifth minute was intercepted by Tim Visser and the wing raced 50 metres to score the game’s first try.Saracens were 17-0 down at half-time but a Richard Wigglesworth try and Losowski conversion made it 17-7, however the No 10 then missed two penalties which could have really given Harlequins the jitters and the home side held on to win. Six of the bestLeicester Tigers achieved a convincing 34-14 win over the previously unbeaten Bath, thanks to what DoR Richard Cockerill called a “proper” Leicester Tigers performance.There were plenty of standout performers in his side, but the Man of the Match was blindside Mike Williams, who stole a lineout from Dave Attwood in the 14th minute to set the Tigers on an attack which resulted in a try for Brendan O’Connor. The No 6 made seven carries during the match and was at the heart of Leicester’s excellent forward play throughout.Get in! Richard Cockerill was pretty chuffed with Leicester’s win over Bath. (Photo: Getty Images) The SinnersUneven playing fieldThe powers that be in the Guinness Pro12 need to correct an imbalance in their competition and ensure that all matches have the benefit of a Television Match Official. Neither of the games hosted in Italy had one this weekend and the Dragons were aggrieved that Treviso’s opening try against them was awarded to Tommaso Benvenutti as the Welsh side felt Tyler Morgan grounded the loose ball in the in-goal area before he did. Treviso went on to win the game 27-11.All teams must play in the same circumstances when they are competing in the same competition so TMOs have to be provided in Italy, just as they are in Ireland, Wales and Scotland. Not-so-slick Nick: Williams dropped a pass and conceded a try. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)Forward fumblesNorthampton made a number of errors as they chased the game against Wasps and Courtney Lawes was guilty of wasting a try-scoring opportunity in the 69th minute when the Saints trailed 13-5. They were attacking strongly and Lawes had the line at his mercy when he dropped a pass from Steve Myler. The pass wasn’t the best – slightly behind Lawes – but the England lock would have hoped to do better.Another forward – Cardiff Blues’ Nick Williams – helped to cost his team a try by fumbling in defence. The No 8 spilled a pass five metres from his own line when the Blues were 23-16 up in the closing minutes of their game at Zebre, the Italians shipped the ball left, Matthew Morgan missed an opportunity to tidy it up and Giovanbattista Venditti scored in the corner. Edoardo Padovani needed to kick the difficult conversion to give Zebre a draw but he missed. Under pressure: Sam Hidalgo-Clyne on the ball and in trouble against Munster. (Photo: Inpho)Sam slips upEdinburgh scrum-half Sam Hidalgo-Clyne gifted Munster a 37th minute try with a sloppy piece of play in the shadow of his own posts and enabled the Irish side to go into half-time 14-7 up.He received the ball in his in-goal area as Edinburgh tried to survive a spell of Munster pressure and he was forced to knock-on beside the posts, allowing hooker Niall Scannell to push the ball back for Conor Murray to pick up and score. From there, Munster kicked on to win this Guinness Pro12 match 28-14 with their pack totally dominating the Edinburgh eight. One scored, one savedDominic Waldouck scored a try at one end of the pitch and saved one at the other as Newcastle won away from home in the Aviva Premiership for the first time since October 2014. The Falcons beat Gloucester 18-13 at Kingsholm and it was Waldouck’s ninth-minute try which set them on their way, as he capitalised when Gloucester scrum-half Willi Heinz was caught in possession and turned over.Halfway through the first half, with the score at 7-7, Gloucester were attacking and Mark Atkinson seemed set to score their second try but Waldouck hauled him down short of the line. Billy Burns kicked a penalty from the resulting breakdown, but if Newcastle had conceded that try they would have found it much tougher to recover. Try time: Liam Williams dives over for the first of his two tries. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)Just Williams, againOne week we will have a Saints and Sinners that doesn’t feature Liam Williams – but this isn’t it, as the Scarlets wing scored two tries to take his side to their first league win of the season, a 17-8 victory over Connacht.A Sinner two weeks ago for conceding a couple of tries, Williams has more than made up for it since then and was a Saint last week as well as this. For his first try against Connacht Williams finished off a good move, taking a scoring pass from Jonathan Davies who received man and ball at the same time but managed to ship a pass to his wing in the blink of an eye.Williams’ second try came after he received the ball from the back of a five-metre scrum and powered through the tackle of Caolin Blade to score in the corner. He received the ball in his own half and decided to back himself to beat the Chiefs defence, scorched past Lachlan Turner on the outside and put Jordan Williams over for the try.Exeter soon extended their lead but Bristol still didn’t lay down and hooker Ross McMillan and his replacement Max Crumpton used their power to grab a try apiece to make the final score a more respectable 34-17. Locked outDonncha O’Callaghan made a try-saving tackle for Worcester which actually brought about a ten-point turnaround in their extraordinary 34-34 draw with Sale Sharks, as the Warriors scored an unconverted try at the other end soon afterwards.The Irish lock brought Dave Seymour down as he dived for the line in the left-hand corner and forced the wing to spill the ball. Worcester repelled the Sale attack from a subsequent penalty, then Cooper Vuna broke out of defence and full-back Jamie Shillcock scored in the opposite corner to give the Warriors a 31-17 lead with 29 minutes to go. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Which players hit the heights in round four of the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12 and who made the costliest errors? Pass masterHarlequins fly-half Tim Swiel produced a pass Dan Carter would be proud of to set up a try for Charlie Walker, which proved decisive in their Aviva Premiership win over Saracens.The 23-year-old No 10 flung out a huge pass across the defence inside the 22, taking a couple of Saracens out of the game and creating an overlap. Tim Visser and Mike Brown shipped the ball on quickly, with Brown pausing just long enough to draw a couple of defenders, and Walker was on hand to score in the corner. Butter fingersRhys Webb – usually a try-maker and scorer extraordinaire – butchered a chance for the Ospreys when they were already 31-0 down to Leinster on Friday evening. Josh Matavesi made a terrific break from halfway and passed to Webb on the 22. The scrum-half just needed to catch the ball and run to the line, but he took his eyes off the ball at the crucial moment and dropped it. TAGS: HighlightNewcastle Falcons last_img read more

Meet the stars of the Rugby World Cup in the latest issue

first_imgThe new issue of Rugby World magazine is brimming with World Cup superstars, plus it comes with a free mini mag! Meet the stars of the Rugby World Cup in the latest issueThe brand new issue of Rugby World magazine introduces you to some of the brightest stars lighting up Japan 2019. These are the big names hunting glory at this year’s Rugby World Cup and the unsung players who make the whole event that much better to watch.And not only do we have a star-packed magazine but we have a FREE mini mag – ‘Born to Dare’ – which tells some the uplifting stories of a few select players at this showcase. It goes pool to pool, discussing these inspiring athletes, as well as showing some historic photographs. It also gives you a little World Cup quiz too.Want to know what else is in the mag? Here are just 15 big reasons you should pick up a copy.1. Meet the England squadRugby World spoke to more than a dozen players in England’s squad to find out about their World Cup memories, jokes in camp and who’s fittest.2. Analysis of All Blacks locksBrodie Retallick and Sam Whitelock are the most experienced locking combination in New Zealand history and, according to All Blacks coach Steve Hansen, also the best.3. Australia’s Michael HooperAustralia’s all-action captain Michael Hooper talks setting standards, saving photos and surfing mishaps…4. Wales in picturesIn this exclusive photo album, members of Warren Gatland’s Wales squad talk through unforgettable moments in their career.5. Japan’s Kenki Fukuoka The electric Japan wing explains his plan to segue from playing rugby to becoming a doctor.Throwing in: Rory Best in Ireland training (Getty Images)6. A fond goodbye to Rory BestThe Ireland captain is gearing up for a fond farewell at the World Cup.7. Behind the scenes with GeorgiaThe Lelos are one of the coming forces in the global game, so Rugby World headed to Tbilisi to get an insight into life in the Georgia camp. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight center_img DOWNLOAD RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S DIGITAL EDITION8. Scotland’s Ryan WilsonA World Cup presents challenges on both sides of the whitewash. Ryan Wilson, the Scotland back-row, discusses the importance of family.9. The journey of James FaivaSpanish professional rugby provided a crucial stepping stone to Tonga honours for this fly-half.10. Russian StandardsThe Bears are competing in only their second World Cup, but what is support for the game like in the largest country on the planet? And how can Russia’s rugby improve?11. France’s Guilhem GuiradoThe selfless hooker has become vital to the harmony of the France national team.Clap him in: Dolan in a tunnel of players (Getty Images)12. Downtime with USA’s Cam DolanThe USA No 8 talks about New Orleans, spearfishing and pre-match songs.13. A column from referee Wayne BarnesThe English referee who is officiating at his fourth World Cup talks about what it is like for officials at the major showcase.14. Samoa’s Jack LamThe Samoa back-row talks contracts, culture and coconut milk.15. Stephen Jones’s guide to the quarter-finalsWith the Japan 2019 knockouts fast approaching, Stephen Jones explains why the last-eight stage of a World Cup tends to deliver defining games – and picks his best and worst throughout history If that wasn’t enough, there’s all these guys too…Jacob Stockdale’s chip and chase tipsUruguay’s Diego MagnoItaly’s Tommaso AllanAnalysis of NZ’s World Cup-winning try in 2011South Africa’s Frans SteynThe Secret Ref discusses ‘bias’A rant about the cost of watching the World CupOwen Slot and Brendan Venter debate tackle height trialsRising stars Heather Cowell and Stewart MooreThe Secret Player on watching matches with puntersFollow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

The lingering effects of Agent Orange

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The lingering effects of Agent Orange Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] Fifty years ago—1962—long before I knew where Nitro, West Virginia, was located, I was a student at Virginia Theological Seminary. Having processed out of the Marine Corp, I had traded my copy of The Uniform Code of Military Justice for a Bible. There would be no more military exercises for war. I was preparing for the exercise of parish ministry.Back then I didn’t know that on January 18, 1962, the United States began spraying dioxin-based Agent Orange in Southeast Asia. During the Vietnam War, 19,000,000 gallons of this deadly chemical was sprayed in Vietnam, eastern Laos, and parts of Cambodia. It is estimated to have killed or maimed some 400,000 people, and been responsible for 500,000 children born with birth defects. Sprayed to deny the enemy hiding places for ambush, Agent Orange also saturated our own troops on the ground.In my first assignment as a priest at St. Anne’s Church in Annapolis, Maryland, I counseled with midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy headed for Vietnam. But it wasn’t until 1974, when I was rector of St. John’s Church in Charleston, West Virginia, that Agent Orange reared its ugly head.By 1974, Vietnam veterans were coming home. St. John’s, as a part of its mission, opened its building to serve as an office where veterans with a variety of war-related problems were able to receive counseling. This was an early effort to begin a West Virginia chapter of Vietnam Veterans of America. It was also a part of an effort, on the part of veterans, to have the U.S. government recognize illness caused by Agent Orange, and for veterans to receive medical treatment for those illnesses.Thanks to the perseverance of veterans who had served in Vietnam, along with family and friends, that effort succeeded.The ugly truth of the matter lies in the fact that a Monsanto chemical plant in the town of Nitro, just 15 miles down the valley from where those veterans met, was the source of the Agent Orange that did so much damage to them and the people of Vietnam.There have been numerous lawsuits over the years against Monsanto, along with six other chemical manufacturers of Agent Orange. Those cases have moved, and continue to move, at a snail’s pace through the courts, thus leaving the people of Vietnam, as well as Americans affected by Agent Orange, without adjudication or compensation for damages.In March of 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the companies were not responsible for the use and destruction caused by Agent Orange because these companies were government contractors, carrying out the instructions of the government.Within the next few weeks, Monsanto will be back in court right here in the county in which Agent Orange was produced 50 years ago. The trial will involve a class action lawsuit arguing that Monsanto dioxin spills may have affected employees in the plant and residents of Nitro, where leaks and dumping took place during the production of Agent Orange. The people will be seeking medical monitoring for at least 5,000, and perhaps as many as 80,000 people.Appalachia is often misunderstood and overlooked. Our mountains isolate us from major media coverage, except when there is a coal mine disaster, or someone distorts our proud culture with jokes about hillbillies. Our poverty is not pretty. We are the “Other America” depicted by Michael Harrington—the America that triggered President Johnson’s “War on Poverty” — a war superseded by the Vietnam War.It would be a grave mistake now for the nation to turn a blind eye on the Putnam County, West Virginia, courtroom where the Agent Orange case will be argued.  Communities all over our nation are affected by the pollution attributed to the very companies that produce jobs and promise economic health.Many of these companies, fueled by short-term economic goals, have a way of abandoning communities—picking up and moving—and leaving long-term environmental and health problems.  Nitro, once subsidized by chemical dollars, must now rely on a dog track and casino gambling to make ends met.Keep an eye on Nitro, West Virginia. You see, our nation sent men and women to fight in Vietnam, sprayed them inadvertently with harmful chemicals, and then brought them home sick to communities where the poisonous herbicide was produced.  On top of that, communities — I am talking about Nitro — where the people who worked in the plant and residents who have lived amidst the residue of carcinogenetic dioxin may very well be suffering illnesses, not from the government, but from Monsanto.— The Rev. Jim Lewis, an Episcopal priest, lives in Charleston, West Virginia, where he does peace and justice work. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books February 6, 2012 at 5:51 pm Thank you for reminding us of the spraying of Agent Orange and its effects brought upon our troops in Vietnam. My father’s only brother did two tours of duty as Army paramedic in Vietnam and died a very painful death years later, in the mid 1970’s. At the time, the attending physician was baffled by the case and gave little guidance to my aunt as to how to care for him at home, where he eventually died within months. And here we are again, welcoming home a new generation of women and men with their unique set of injuries both seen and unseen.God bless you and your ministry, you are on my prayer list. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 6, 2012 at 4:33 pm Thank you for such a good report on the after effects of Agent Orange. In my 16 years in working hospice, I an still haunted by the memory the patient who we with worked daily in the inpatient hospice unit for 2 months straight trying to manage his pain. He was not only drenched by the Agent Orange, he got to mop it up at the end of the day. He is the only patient in the 1000s of patients that I cared for who died in excruciating pain. Allen Johnson says: Barbara Danner says: Rector Tampa, FL Carolyn Nicol says: February 10, 2012 at 10:24 pm Profound thanks to Jim Lewis who has spoken out against injustice for decades now. Your courage inspires us, Jim. And many thanks to ENS for drawing attention to this terrible wrong by publishing Jim’s piece on its pages. February 15, 2012 at 7:35 pm My husband was a chopper pilot. He spent three tours in Nam. He passed away 30 September 2011 from pneumonia related to Agent Orange Cancer. His brother was a Marine on the DMZ. He is dying with a lung disease related to Orange. Two brothers out of a family that fought for their country and went because they were told to go. In case you don’t know, Round Up, that kills weeds has the same chemicals as Orange. I was in Nam and got lucky. I was on a post near a river and it was sprayed constantly to peel back the jungle to make it safer for the River Rats, boats that patroled the river for sampans loaded with weapons. My son is a Marine and has spent four tours in the ME. He has come home as good as when he went. The Rev. Joe Parrish says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 6, 2012 at 4:34 pm Thank you for writing this piece and for the peace and justice work you do. The loss and damage go on and on with many generations affected. The In Memory Program of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund helps families who continue to lose loved ones due to Agent Orange. That we have begun new rounds of damage due to the wars in the Middle East is so very sad. As long as men in power provoke and react with wars there will be destruction in widening circles. We continue to teach peacemaking and pray for the many victims of war. Bless you for your efforts and concern. Featured Events February 6, 2012 at 8:52 pm Several families in Newark, New Jersey, several years ago got recourse from the company that produced Agent Orange there. Many bad batches were dumped into the Passaic River between Newark and Harrison and owing to their insolubility still remain there on the bottom slowly leaching and moving into the Newark Bay and then into the Atlantic fishing grounds. No removal is planned by the USEPA, unfortunately. Out of sight, out of mind? The NJDEP found over 400 fishermen fish in the Newark Bay even though it is posted “No Fishing” on the New Jersey side but not on the Staten Island side. All the fish and crabs are contaminated; still no action by NJ/NYDEC. Barbara Hill says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC February 6, 2012 at 4:48 pm Rev. Jim, Thanks for your article – my oldest brother Eugene Gillbert suffers from bladder cancer and other malidies as a result Orange Poisioning that they used for testing as a defoliant when he was in basic training for the Army. I expect there are many more that suffer similar effects. He as been working thru Senators Susan Collins and Olympia Snow here in Maine to get compensation for his medical bills but because he did not tour Vietnam he is not eligible. I am a deacon at two Episcopal churches in Maine – St. Martins in Palmyra and All Saints in Skowhegan and I appreciate you drawing attention to these injustices of lingering effects since many are not aware. Keep up the good work my Brother in Christ,Rev. Tom Gilbert, Deacon Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 5, 2016 at 6:50 am I just saw this and wanted to add that where I grew up near Ansted West Va they sprayed Agent Orange on our power lines while I was growing up, a lot of us have many medical problems including cancer, many have passed away from cancer. Is there any way to prove that Agent Orange was and could still be in the grounds where I grew up? Our water was well and spring water, still is there. We played outside while our power lines were being sprayed right next to our houses…not knowing how dangerous the spray was. Thank you… Fern Bibb Boylen [email protected] Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Alynn Beimford says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Jim LewisPosted Feb 6, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Yvette Tsiropoulos says: Fern Bibb Boylen says: Comments (11) Rector Knoxville, TN August 23, 2012 at 6:35 pm Thank u for such informative information. I have a cousin that is effect by this ordeal! And recently after a family members funeral I attended along with my cousin. I was in for the surprise of my life.The mental stress on him was unbelievable! I was young when he would return to visit us, so I wasn’t made aware of his issues. Now being 54 and he is 67 I did a 10- 12 hour car ride from North Caroline, to New Jersey with him!! Wow….. Was I in for a rude awaking!After telling other family members of this, I decided to do some research on line.Again Thank You AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Rev. Gina Volpe says: Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Katerina Whitley says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York February 8, 2012 at 7:52 am Jim Lewis flushes out of the closet several important moral imperatives, to which I’ll comment. First, the use of Agent Orange in Vietnam was chemical warfare, one of the big three of “weapons of mass destruction,” the other two being nuclear and biological. That Agent Orange’s target of death was plants does not obviate its “collateral damage” on people. Anymore than the use of land mines to prevent enemy troop movements obviate its horrible carnage on civilian populations. (The United States, by the way, is one of only a few nations that refuses to agree to an international treaty banning land mines). And while I am on a rant against such weapons of mass destruction, I should point out another West Virginia manufacturing connection. Which is Alliant Techsystems/Allegany Ballistics Laboratory in Rocket City, West Virginia, (near Keyser) where radioactive depleted uranium is re-manufactured for munitions. Depleted Uranium has been used extensively in both Iraq wars, leading to large numbers of cancers and birth defects. Finally, I should mention that studies are coming out correlating the mining method of mountaintop removal (a form of strip mining which produces high levels of air pollution) with high rates of birth defects, cancers, and respiratory illnesses. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rev Tom Gilbert (Deacon) says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 February 16, 2012 at 12:05 pm My husband, along with most of the men active in The American Legion in their 60’s and 70’s, is suffering cancers related to Agent Orange. What we failed to observe was that in the 1950’s this same product was used along roads being built in Appalachia and northbound to the Canadian Border. Many ‘baby-boomers’ suffering from these same cancers can blame the same companies, the same local, state and federal governments. My prayer is that we have learned a lesson we don’t have to pass to the next generations. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

U.S. Christians hope for an ‘ecumenical spring’

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC By Adelle M. BanksPosted Mar 13, 2012 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA U.S. Christians hope for an ‘ecumenical spring’ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Ecumenical News International] For years, advocates for greater unity among Christian churches have wrung their hands amid talk of an “ecumenical winter.” But now, 10 years after leaders took the first steps toward forming the broad-based group Christian Churches Together in the USA (CCT), some have hopes that U.S. churches may be entering a new season of closer relations.At a recent CCT meeting in Memphis, Tennessee, 85 Christians — Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox, white and nonwhite — made pilgrimages to historic sites of the civil rights movement, Religion News Service reports. They also made plans to use next year’s 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” to pursue anti-poverty projects with houses of worship unlike their own.“I would like to think of it as an ecumenical spring and that we do not yet know what will break forth,” said the Rev. Stephen J. Sidorak Jr., ecumenical staff officer of the United Methodist Church. “I think that there’s the potential for the ecumenical movement to be more alive than it’s ever been because it will be more inclusive.”In many ways, the movement that has grappled with theological differences, leadership struggles, finances — and even what to call itself — is in the midst of major down-sizing that they hope will lead to wider engagement:— The National Council of Churches (NCC), the flagship agency of ecumenism, has shrunk from some 400 staffers in its heyday in the 1960s to fewer than 20. It is seeking a “transitional general secretary” after its executive, the Rev. Michael Kinnamon, stepped down on 31 December.— Churches Uniting in Christ, a network that dates to the 1960s, closed its office doors in 2010 and one of its nine affiliated denominations — the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church — has suspended its membership. CUIC’s remaining leaders hope to continue to address racism and shared ministries.— CCT itself is looking for new leadership after its part-time executive director announced his retirement. Though it includes “families” of Catholic, Orthodox, historic and evangelical Protestant faiths, it has struggled to find acceptance among the “historic racial/ethnic” churches.Ecumenical veterans say a movement that was built on slow-moving bureaucracies needs to find a way to stay nimble in the 21st century. “It’s a little bit like keeping the post office running,” said the Rev. Wesley Granberg-Michaelson, the outgoing president of CCT’s historic Protestant family.Part of the new approach includes a move away from the word “ecumenical.” Some Christians who had been hesitant about interchurch relations equate the word with liberal stances, or fear it could be linked to surrendering some of their theological distinctions.“We’ve tried to shift away from that ecumenical language toward Christian unity language,” said the Rev. Richard Hamm, the retiring CCT executive director.Neville Callam, the general secretary of the Baptist World Alliance, said some Baptists have bristled at the term. “Many still don’t like the word but many are growing into an understanding of the importance of the concept,” he said.The presence of evangelicals — and particularly Pentecostals — is growing in the organized networks and ad hoc partnerships that develop over issues like poverty. “If you take sex out of the equation in all of its expressions, it turns out that we actually have a lot in common as we look at issues,” said Hamm, the former president of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).He and others point to the influence of the Circle of Protection, which last year urged Washington to maintain programs for the poor amid federal budget cuts. That initiative included the presidents of the NCC and the National Association of Evangelicals, as well as leaders of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and black and Hispanic groups.“I would give priority to ecumenical meetings that are driven by mutual purpose rather than just getting together to talk,” said Leith Anderson, president of the National Association of Evangelicals.In the early days of his ecumenical work, the Rev. Cecil Robeck Jr. faced resistance from fellow Pentecostals. But later this month, the professor of church history and ecumenics at Fuller Theological Seminary will speak to executives of his Assemblies of God denomination about his inter-church experiences.“God did something, I would say,” said Robeck, who was a keynoter at CCT’s 2010 meeting, which focused on evangelism.Assemblies of God General Superintendent George Wood, however, said Robeck’s upcoming talk “is not an indicator regarding the Assemblies of God USA moving forward to membership in the ecumenical movement.”While black church leaders have long been part of Churches Uniting in Christ, some are less interested in CCT. Christian Methodist Episcopal Church Senior Bishop Thomas Hoyt Jr. said it’s not a priority for his denomination.“I think it’s so broad right now,” Hoyt said of CCT, where leaders “don’t vote on anything unless everybody can say yes to it.”The Rev. Robina Winbush, president of Churches Uniting in Christ, said her organization is “wrestling” with how to conquer racial divides between Protestant denominations. Despite some “serious missteps” along the way, the ecumenical officer for the Presbyterian Church (USA) said CUIC remains part of the ecumenical movement because member churches demanded it.“Primarily our lesson learned is that when you prematurely begin to dismantle something before the churches say that’s what they want to have happen, you have to spend the energy to put stuff back together,” she said. Ecumenical & Interreligious Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

Canterbury’s message to South Sudan’s Episcopal, Catholic bishops

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted May 14, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Sudan & South Sudan Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Africa, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Lambeth Palace] The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, has sent a message of support to a meeting of Episcopal and Catholic Bishops in South Sudan.The fourteen bishops, representing the Catholic and Episcopal Churches of South Sudan, met in Yei, South Sudan, from 9th – 11th May 2012.  Led by Archbishop Paulino Lukudu Loro and Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul, the bishops met to pray and reflect together on the relationship between the two Churches, their wider ecumenical responsibilities, and the role they can play in bringing peace and understanding between Sudan and South Sudan. Their brother bishops from the Republic of Sudan were unable to attend the meeting due to the current political situation.The message from Archbishop Rowan Williams to the bishops follows: My dear brothers in Christ,Greetings to you all in the name of our risen Lord Jesus Christ.I send you warmest greetings and hold you in special prayer as you meet together in Yei.  Your coming together as ECS and Catholic bishops is a great sign of hope for the people of Sudan and South Sudan and for all God’s people.When I visited in 2006, there were so many hopes after the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA).  We have journeyed with you through times of great celebration and severe stress and we will continue to walk with you, grateful as your brother and sisters in Christ for your steadfast witness both in sorrow and in joy.We are keenly aware of the great suffering caused by the non-implementation of several key parts of the CPA.  The cry of pain continues to be heard from South Kordofan, Blue Nile and Abyei, as well as from those affected by the escalation of conflict in the border region between Sudan and South Sudan.  I pray that the UN Security Council Resolution and the AU Roadmap will result in real progress in settling the outstanding issues.The church’s dedicated efforts in peace-building and advocacy continue to represent a powerful witness to the gospel.  We are inspired by the untiring efforts to bring peace in Jonglei.  We also stand in special solidarity with the church’s situation in the Republic of Sudan and will continue to press for freedom of religion and worship and the safety of the Christian community.It is a great tribute to the Sudanese Church that it continues to set before the world the vision of a just and peaceful Sudan and South Sudan and to work for its transformation through holistic and equitable development for all.  I hope that this joint meeting will be a time of refreshment and encouragement for you.  May the risen Christ come among you as he did among his disciples and give you his peace.   May his Spirit come upon you and empower you mightily in this calling.With every blessing,+Rowan CantuarThe Archbishop of York, the Most Reverend John Sentamu, and facilitators from the Southern African Catholic Bishops’ Conference, attended the meeting in a demonstration of solidarity by the Universal Church. The Special Representative of the UN Secretary General, Ms Hilde Johnson, visited the bishops, who expressed to her their appreciation for the work of UNMISS, particularly in the Jonglei peace process. The bishops welcomed the peace accord signed by leaders of the six communities of Jonglei State and urged all stakeholders to implement the resolutions and recommendations.The bishops analysed the events which led to the current crisis between Sudan and South Sudan. While thanking the International Community for all its support over the years, the bishops nevertheless called for greater understanding of the aspirations of the South Sudanese people as they build a new and sovereign nation.They welcomed UN Security Council Resolution 2046 and called for its immediate and full implementation. They expressed their concern about the situation of South Sudanese and other marginalised peoples in the Republic of Sudan, and condemned the continuing aerial bombardment of civilans by Sudan Armed Forces.The bishops recommitted themselves to work ecumenically, and considered how they could strengthen the Sudan Council of Churches in this period of transition and crisis between the two nations.The bishops released a Message of Peace entitled “We have a dream”, stating:“We dream of two nations which are democratic and free, where people of all religions, all ethnic groups, all cultures and all languages enjoy equal human rights based on citizenship. We dream of two nations at peace with each other, cooperating to make the best use of their God-given resources, promoting free interaction between their citizens, living side by side in solidarity and mutual respect, celebrating their shared history and forgiving any wrongs they may have done to each other. We dream of people no longer traumatised, of children who can go to school, of mothers who can attend clinics, of an end to poverty and malnutrition, and of Christians and Muslims who can attend church or mosque freely without fear. Enough is enough.There should be no more war between Sudan and South Sudan!”The communiqué can be downloaded here as a Word document. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canterbury’s message to South Sudan’s Episcopal, Catholic bishops Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Ecumenical & Interreligious, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

Persecution may be ‘tip of the iceberg,’ say Peshawar Christians

first_imgPersecution may be ‘tip of the iceberg,’ say Peshawar Christians Julian Malakar says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 November 26, 2014 at 11:52 am Openly killing minority Christians with heroic welcome for killers in Pakistan by Muslim majority is State Sponsored hate crime against Christian, against all humanity. Obama government and all human right groups should pressure Pakistan for exemplary punishments for such heinous crime against humanity, as America put pressure against African countries where homosexuality is capital punishment. Pakistan government and its people are not savage like terrorists that by Pakistani public pressure government would overlook civilized legal demand bringing criminals into justice.Opening doors of Christian Cathedrals for Muslims worshipers for declaring their faith on their Allah is not the answer to bring criminal into justice. Establishing rule of laws in face of our earth is the answer to stop systematic Christian prosecutions around the world. Christian must wake up to raise their voice to live with equal rights in Muslim majority countries, as Muslims are enjoying freedom living in AMERICA, EUROPE OR IN INDIA with majority non-Muslims. Muslims must learn basic to live in peace with give and take peace among all faiths in this world.God will protect us from evil power as He did reconciling sinners like us with Him who is Holy thru birth, crucifixion and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. May peace of God in all understanding be among all people of the World including Muslims as He promised by Advent! [Anglican Communion News Service] Christians in Pakistan worry that the persecution they have experienced to date may be “just the tip of the iceberg.”In the latest newsletter from the Diocese of Peshawar, a list of 22 incidents of violence against Christians in the country since 2013 accompanied a warning that “things are likely to get worse” because of the possibility of the presence of an extremist group called “Daish” (ISIS) in Pakistan.Along with the 2013 twin suicide bombing of All Saints’ Church, Peshawar – that killed 119 people and injured many more – the writer compiled other attacks on Christians in Pakistan from information provided by the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.These included an assassination attempt on a Christian lawyer in Lahore; a 58-year-old man killed for allegedly blaspheming Islam; shops belonging to Christians in Islamabad being burned down; several people being killed for converting to Christianity; and Christian girls raped and, in some instances, forced to convert to Islam.The most recent incident was the burning of a Christian couple, Shahzad and Shama Bibi, in a brick kiln following trumped up blasphemy charges. [Read a report about it here].November’s special edition of the Frontier News newsletter, with the headline The Diocese Condemns!, contained a report of the protest march earlier in the month led by the diocese. It started at St. John’s Cathedral and ended at the Peshawar Press Club where church leaders held a press conference to condemn the murders.The newsletter author wrote, “According to the sources, Shahzad and his wife Shama Bibi came to Chak-59 for their livelihood. The owner of the kiln Yousaf Gujar, over a dispute about a non-payment of advance money, locked the couple in a room and called upon the villagers. He blamed the couple for blasphemy. After severely beating them, the infuriated mob threw them in the brick kiln and set them afire.“Once again, the personal vendetta against poor Christians is changed into the allegation of Blasphemy Law of Pakistan. This section of the law is always used, rather misused against the Christians for their persecution and extra judicial killings in Pakistan.”Speaking at the press conference, Bishop Munawar Rumalshah, bishop emeritus of the Diocese of Peshawar, said the incident was “a national disgrace” and called the government to bring the killers to book.He added, “The Christians of Pakistan are law abiding citizens, and they respect other people’s beliefs. Christians believe in peaceful co-existence of different religions and always play a proactive and positive role for interfaith harmony in the region.”The diocese’s newsletter concluded: “Nowadays, talking against the blasphemy law in any manner has itself become an act of blasphemy. This is just the tip of the iceberg, things are likely to get worse as there are rumours of the presence of an extremist group called “Daish” (ISIS) in Pakistan.” Comments (1) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Tags Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By ACNS staffPosted Nov 25, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Asia Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

Cornelia Eaton ordained priest in Navajoland

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Rev. Canon Cornelia Eaton and Navajoland Bishop David Bailey pose Feb. 7 after her ordination to the priesthood. Photo: Dick Snyder[Episcopal News Service] In a liturgy that combined Anglican and Navajo traditions, the Rev. Canon Cornelia Eaton was ordained priest in the Episcopal Church.She serves as canon to the ordinary for Navajoland Bishop David Bailey, who ordained her.The service took place Feb. 7 at All Saints Church in Farmington, New Mexico, where her late father, the Rev. Yazzie Mason, had served as deacon. Among the participants in the liturgy was her mother, Alice Mason, who served as lay pastor of St. Michael’s Church in Upper Fruitland, New Mexico, for 30 years. She was one of the presenters.The liturgy included readings and hymns in English and Navajo, and smudging by Eaton and the Rev. Catherine Plummer, widow of the late Navajoland Bishop Steven Plummer.Bailey noted that Eaton has “been on a journey that has led to her being a priest,” and that she had long served the Episcopal Church in Navajoland as a youth minister, lay leader and assistant to the bishop.The Rev. Canon Cornelia Eaton is presented to Navajoland Bishop David Bailey for ordination to the priesthood Feb. 7 at All Saints Church in Farmington, New Mexico. Among the presenters is Eaton’s mother, Alice Mason (center), who served as lay pastor of St. Michael’s Church in Upper Fruitland, New Mexico, for 30 years. Photo: Dick SnyderThe bishop had ordained Eaton as deacon in the same church on Dec. 21, 2013.She also served as a chaplain for the last General Convention of the Episcopal Church, offering daily meditations and prayers for the House of Deputies. Eaton will be a Navajoland clergy deputy to the June 25-July 3 meeting of General Convention in Salt Lake City.With Eaton’s ordination as priest, Bailey has ordained three Navajo, or Diné, as priests and three more as transitional deacons. There are another three Diné in the ordination process. Eaton is the fourth female Diné following Plummer, the Rev. Rosella Jim and the Rev. Inez Velarde.Eaton has completed courses at Vancouver School of Theology in Vancouver, British Columbia, and training offered through the Bishops’ Collaborative of the Episcopal Church. This fall, she will enter Virginia Theological Seminary.She celebrated her first Eucharist as priest on Feb. 8, with Bailey assisting.— The Rev. Dick Snyder is missioner for special projects in Navajoland and is employed as a prison chaplain in Nevada. Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis People Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing February 10, 2015 at 8:59 pm And a joy not just to Navajoland but a healthy step forward for The Episcopal Church and, yes, ‘the whole state of Christ’s Church’! Ira Phillips says: Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL February 11, 2015 at 9:23 am As a Cherokee and Episcopalian it gives me great joy in seeing American Indians become leaders in the church. Congratulations! Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing February 10, 2015 at 6:37 pm A joyous day for Navajoland, Canon Eaton, and TEC. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cornelia Eaton ordained priest in Navajoland By Dick Snyder Posted Feb 9, 2015 Nancy Mott says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: February 12, 2015 at 1:28 pm This is fantastic! Bishop David and the lay/clergy leadership are creatively and faithfully furture for the witness of Navajoland and modeling for our larger Church. I know they have many challenges but their commitment is awesome.Nathan BaxterBishop, retiredCentral Pennsylvania Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Nathan D. Baxter says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (4) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more