The Children Never Had Covid. So Why Did They Have Coronavirus Antibodies?

first_imgThen why do we have a pandemic? Shouldn’t most of us be protected by memory cells left by other coronavirus infections? – Advertisement – Now the researchers are planning to expand their study to monitor thousands of children and adults. Some have antibodies that can block the new coronavirus in lab tests. Others do not.“If they have the pandemic strain, are they protected?” Dr. Kassiotis asked. Will they get sick, he wondered, or will the infection be all but undetectable?Dr. Elledge and his colleagues at Harvard developed their own highly specific, sensitive and exhaustive antibody test, VirScan. It is able to detect a diverse collection of antibodies with that are directed at any of more than 800 places on the new coronavirus, including the antibody that Dr. Kassiotis and his colleagues studied.After examining blood taken from 190 people before the pandemic emerged, Dr. Elledge and his colleagues concluded that many already had antibodies, including the one targeting the base of the spike — presumably from infections with related coronaviruses that cause colds.But while adults might get one or two colds a year, Dr. Elledge said, children may get up to a dozen. As a result, many develop floods of coronavirus antibodies that are present almost continuously; they may lessen cold symptoms, or even leave children with colds that are symptomless but still infectious.While adults may not have detectable coronavirus antibodies, many may be able to quickly make antibodies if they are infected with a coronavirus.In typical viral infections, the immune system pours out antibodies to fight the virus. When the infection is quelled, the antibodies, no longer needed, diminish in number. But the body is left with so-called memory cells that allow antibody production to soar rapidly if the virus tries to invade again. The Coronavirus Outbreak ›Words to Know About TestingConfused by the terms about coronavirus testing? Let us help: In a study published Friday in Science, the group, led by George Kassiotis, who heads the Retroviral Immunology Laboratory at the institute, reports that on average only 5 percent of adults had these antibodies, but 43 percent of children did.Researchers who did not participate in the study were intrigued by the finding. H. Benjamin Larman, an immunologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, called it a “well-done study that puts forward a compelling theory which is supported by their data.” While the tip of the spike is unique to the new coronavirus, the base is found in all coronaviruses, Dr. Kassiotis said. In lab tests, antibodies to the base of the spike prevented the new coronavirus from entering cells in order to reproduce. Stephen J. Elledge, a genetics professor at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, had a similar response. He and others have found many people have antibodies to common colds caused by other coronaviruses; in laboratory studies, these antibodies also block the new coronavirus.- Advertisement –center_img In March, as the pandemic was just beginning, Dr. Kassiotis and his colleagues decided to develop a highly sensitive antibody test. To assess it, they examined blood samples taken before the pandemic from over 300 adults and 48 children and adolescents, comparing them with samples from more than 170 people who had been infected with the new coronavirus.The scientists expected samples taken before the pandemic to have no antibodies that attacked the new coronavirus. Those were to be the controls for the test the scientists were developing.Instead, they found that many children, and some adults, carried one antibody in particular that can prevent coronaviruses, including the new one, from entering cells. This antibody attaches itself to a spike that pokes out of coronaviruses.- Advertisement – “It is quite possible that you lose your memory over time,” Dr. Elledge said. He suspects that the new coronavirus may interfere with the activation of the memory cells able to respond to the infection.An infection “might give you a hazy memory that fades over time,” he said. If so, a very recent infection with a common cold coronavirus would be needed to protect against the new coronavirus, and even then the protection might last only for a limited time.The new coronavirus would have hobbled the production of antibodies that specifically attack it. That might explain why children, with their seemingly continuous colds, are much better off than adults.Dr. Elledge said that if he is right about the loss of memory cells, that bodes well for vaccines. A vaccine boosts antibody production without the presence of a virus. So the virus “is not in the background, messing up memory cell formation,” he said.Another possibility is that most adults actually are protected by memory cells from previous infections with the common cold. Although few have enough antibodies in their blood to protect them at any given time, they may be able to quickly make antibodies to lessen the impact of the new coronavirus.That might explain why many adults who are infected recover quickly.“We focus on those who get really sick, but 95 to 98 percent of those who get the virus don’t have to go to the hospital,” Dr. Elledge said. “There are a lot of people who do get better.” Antibody: A protein produced by the immune system that can recognize and attach precisely to specific kinds of viruses, bacteria, or other invaders.Antibody test/serology test: A test that detects antibodies specific to the coronavirus. Antibodies begin to appear in the blood about a week after the coronavirus has infected the body. Because antibodies take so long to develop, an antibody test can’t reliably diagnose an ongoing infection. But it can identify people who have been exposed to the coronavirus in the past.Antigen test: This test detects bits of coronavirus proteins called antigens. Antigen tests are fast, taking as little as five minutes, but are less accurate than tests that detect genetic material from the virus.Coronavirus: Any virus that belongs to the Orthocoronavirinae family of viruses. The coronavirus that causes Covid-19 is known as SARS-CoV-2. Covid-19: The disease caused by the new coronavirus. The name is short for coronavirus disease 2019.Isolation and quarantine: Isolation is the separation of people who know they are sick with a contagious disease from those who are not sick. Quarantine refers to restricting the movement of people who have been exposed to a virus.Nasopharyngeal swab: A long, flexible stick, tipped with a soft swab, that is inserted deep into the nose to get samples from the space where the nasal cavity meets the throat. Samples for coronavirus tests can also be collected with swabs that do not go as deep into the nose — sometimes called nasal swabs — or oral or throat swabs.Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): Scientists use PCR to make millions of copies of genetic material in a sample. Tests that use PCR enable researchers to detect the coronavirus even when it is scarce.Viral load: The amount of virus in a person’s body. In people infected by the coronavirus, the viral load may peak before they start to show symptoms, if symptoms appear at all. That happened to Dr. Larman and his family of five. Four of them got sick with Covid-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, in July. None were seriously ill, and his 4-year-old son was spared altogether.“My son was not isolated from us and therefore heavily exposed,” Dr. Larman said. “He tested negative twice, and so we certainly suspect that he had some form of pre-existing immunity.” It’s been a big puzzle of the pandemic: Why are children so much less likely than adults to become infected with the new coronavirus and, if infected, less likely to become ill?A possible reason may be that many children already have antibodies to other coronaviruses, according to researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London. About one in five of the colds that plague children are caused by viruses in this family. Antibodies to those viruses may also block SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus causing the pandemic.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Prisca Julien is Woman of the Bible 2014

first_img Share Share EntertainmentFaithLifestyleLocalNews Prisca Julien is Woman of the Bible 2014 by: – July 14, 2014 Sharing is caring! 310 Views   no discussionscenter_img Tweet Share Prisca Julien: Woman of the Bible 2014.Prisca Julien of the Coulibistrie Gospel Mission is the 2014 Woman of the Bible contest winner. Julien, who portrayed Rahab the Harlot, defeated ten other contestants for the title and also captured the best talent award at the Arawak House of Culture in Roseau on July 13, 2014.Leah Dodds, of the People’s Pentecostal Church, who emerged 1st runner up, portrayed the woman at the well.Andesse Thomas of God’s Family House of Worship in Portsmouth, who portrayed Mirium, was 2nd runner up, while Almira Lewis of the Rhema Center in Grand Bay, who depicted Abigail, captured the awards for best speech and best at bible knowledge.Amanda Lincia Barrie of the Living Hope Fellowship Church of Massacre, who portrayed Sarah, won the life skills award.The contest went through a number of competing rounds including talent, speech, elegance and biblical knowledge segment where the ladies brought to life the biblical wear of that era, portraying a queen or Heroine of the Bible. The other contestants were:Josian Auguiste of Faith Community Church, Mahaut who portrayed MARY MAGDALENE;Melanda Caesar of Soufriere CUC who depicted LEAH;Stanna Fontaine of Dubique Gospel Mission church who depicted JEPHTHAH’S DAUAGHTER;Julie-Ann Charles of Layou CUC who depicted QUEEN OF SHEBA;Philsia Pendenque of Warner Seventh Day Adventist Church who depicted QUEEN ESTHER andDanielle Vital of Deliverance Baptist Church in Goodwill portrayed HANNAH.Each contestant was presented with a token of appreciation.Here are some moments:– / 38Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

Suarez seeking friendly resolution

first_img However, Suarez remains determined to find a way out of Anfield and admits even captain Steven Gerrard’s pleas for him to stay cannot offset the lure of the Champions League, while also reiterating he would jump at the chance to go to Real Madrid. “I’m still defending the Liverpool shirt and I will do so until the last minute,” Suarez, who was left at home for Wednesday night’s friendly against Valerenga in Norway because of injury and is unlikely to feature against Celtic in Dublin on Saturday, told Spanish newspaper Marca. “My aim is to reach an agreement with the club in a friendly manner and I hope the clause we agreed a year ago is fulfilled. Up to now, it hasn’t been. “It’s not that I want to or am desperate to leave, but I like things to be clear and a year ago I made my position to the club clear. “Gerrard has a lot of history with Liverpool and his words are very important but everyone should understand that I need to play the Champions League to keep growing as a footballer. “Now I have the chance, I want to take it. A Champions League team (Arsenal) is making a big effort to get me and one always wants to be where they feel comfortable. “There were a lot of rumours (about Real) that were different to reality: Madrid never called me personally or Liverpool to try and negotiate. “Every player aspires to reach the top and Real Madrid is among the most important clubs in the world. It would be very difficult to say no to Real Madrid.” Asked where he would choose to go were it up to him Suarez, who earlier in the summer complained about his treatment by the British press, added: “I would decide what’s best for my private life and my family.” Suarez maintains he has an agreement with Liverpool which, following their failure to qualify for the Champions League, allows him to leave if any club bids £40million. Arsenal tested that theory with an offer which exceeded the figure by a pound but it was rejected by the Merseysiders who insists they have no obligation to sell at that price, only open negotiations. Gordon Taylor, chief executive of the Professional Footballers’ Association, told Press Association Sport he did not believe there was a “cast-iron” buy-out clause and as he understood the situation Liverpool were not under any obligation to sell. Suarez thinks differently however. “We (Suarez and his agents) had an offer from a Champions League team, we considered the situation and decided that, as a new coach (Rodgers) was coming, and the club was making a big effort to get into Europe, we should renew my contract with a new clause: if we didn’t get into the Champions League I could leave if there was an offer of over £40 million,” he told Marca. “I don’t feel that (these are his last days at the club). I’m still enjoying being at Liverpool and the moments I’m experiencing with this club. “I’ll remember the day of my debut, and that I came here from Ajax with great expectations and then played some unforgettable games.” On his last two public appearances – Gerrard’s testimonial on Saturday and an open training session on Monday – Suarez was cheered by fans. That appreciation will not repeated in the wake of Wednesday’s developments despite the player’s protestations of praise for the support he has received during a turbulent time at the club in which he was banned for eight matches for racially abusing Manchester United’s Patrice Evra and received a 10-game suspension – six of which are still outstanding – for biting Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic. “The Liverpool fans are incredible. I’m very grateful for their support,” he said. “I’m very proud to feel their love and it demonstrates that I’m doing a good job.” Former Liverpool defender Jamie Carragher has backed Rodgers’ stance over Suarez. “I think it’s probably right for Brendan Rodgers to take him out of the group,” Carragher, who retired at the end of last season after more than two decades with Reds, told Sky Sports News. “No one player is bigger than the squad, and he’s not actually going to be playing because he’s banned, so Liverpool need to concentrate on getting right for that first game of the season against Stoke. “And if Suarez is a distraction for everyone he needs to be taken out of the group.” The 35-year-old also believes Liverpool might be more willing to let the former Ajax forward leave Anfield if it was not to one of their main domestic rivals. “Arsenal are a big rival for a top-four place,” he added. “Maybe if he wanted to go somewhere else it wouldn’t be such a big issue and maybe Liverpool would sanction a deal because nobody wants unhappy players at the training ground, on the pitch….it affects other people. But it’s very difficult for Liverpool.” The Reds boss is unhappy with the attitude shown by the Uruguay international – who seems intent on forcing a move to Arsenal – in recent weeks and has been told to train on his own. Rodgers rejected Suarez’s claim he had reneged on an agreement last summer which would allow the player to leave for a Champions League club, saying interviews given by the 26-year-old suggesting as much showed “total disrespect” to the club. Press Association Wantaway Liverpool striker Luis Suarez still hopes to come to a “friendly” resolution with the club over his transfer saga despite incurring the wrath of manager Brendan Rodgers.last_img read more

Gutsy Ansgar makes all

first_img Sabrina Harty’s 8-1 shot was fast out of the stalls in the seven-furlong contest and Smullen was happy to play the role of pacemaker. O’Brien’s 6-4 favourite Darwin, turning out just six days after winning at Fairyhouse, loomed up ominously under the trainer’s son Joseph , but was unable to reel in Ansgar who passed the post a length to the good. Ansgar cut out virtually every yard of the running in the hands of Pat Smullen to land the Group Three Michael Murphy Home Furnishings Minstrel Stakes at the Curragh. The hard-luck story of the race was that of Eastern Rules, who found himself trapped behind a wall of horses before flying home against the far rail to finish third. Harty said: “That was fantastic and the horse really deserves it. “He’s had so many hold-ups. He had a kissing spine last year and sore shins a couple of years ago. He got a splint in May and was lame after Ascot. “He’s a proper horse considering all the problems he’s had. He’s a massive horse, he’s 16 hands 2 and he’s been growing and growing. “I’m delighted for the owners. He’s a machine and if he hadn’t had all the problems he’d have been a special one. “He’s entered in the Group Three at Leopardstown on August 14 (Desmond Stakes) and that’s his target.” A tremendous afternoon for the Harty team was completed by Breathe Easy (7-2) and Rory Cleary in the Kilsaran 50th Anniversary Handicap. Harty said: “He has serious ability, but is so nervous and fragile. Rory gave him a great ride and got him settled early.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Men’s basketball edges out narrow victory over Long Beach State

first_imgThe men’s basketball team hung on for its third consecutive win with a 75-65 victory over Long Beach State at the Galen Center on Wednesday.Redshirt junior Derryck Thornton made his return after missing the past two games, adding much needed depth to the Trojans’ backcourt while star freshman Kevin Porter Jr. remains sidelined. Long Beach State did not shoot the ball well, but its shifty guards pressured the USC defense and drew fouls, an issue that has plagued USC early on in the season. Even without senior guard Deishaun Booker, who averages a team-high 16 points, the 49ers’ impressive 12-deep rotation kept them competitive all night long. Thornton gave USC a spark early on with 7 points and four assists in the opening half, yet the Trojans continued their string of slow starts, trailing 9-6 after several minutes of play. Freshman point guard Elijah Weaver, who came off the bench after starting last game, continued his confident play, hitting two triples and sparking the team a quick 7-0 run that helped them take a 36-28 lead at the half. USC used LBSU’s greatest strength — crafty dribble penetration — against them, as Thornton and Weaver got to the lane with ease to create spot up shots for their teammates and allowing six Trojans to hit 3-pointers in the half. Weaver easily slid over to the two with his 6-foot-5 frame as Thornton ran point, something that Thornton hopes they will continue to do moving forward.“He’s a great player, super good,” Thornton said of Weaver. “He just has a good feel for the game. It definitely makes it easier having two point guards on the floor on the same time.” USC continued its unselfish play and hot shooting into the second half, pushing the ball down the floor and showcasing its superior athleticism. However, Long Beach State would not go down easily. They slowed the pace of the game down, out-rebounding USC 47-45 and capitalizing on careless turnovers for easy buckets. Guard Jordan Roberts stepped up in Booker’s absence, outscoring USC’s bench on his own with a career-high 13 points. Head coach Andy Enfield made an aggressive in-game adjustment, switching to a full court press in hopes of rattling the 49ers, but the tactic was easily broken down. The Trojans were forced to switch back to a zone, something they have not done as much this year.“Our man-to-man defense has been pretty good most of the season,” Enfield said. “We’re holding teams to about 37 percent from the field. We’re getting better defensively. Last year, our zone was terrific. This year, because we’ve had so many injuries, our zone is not as good as it has been.”Junior forward Nick Rakocevic heated up down the stretch, showing confidence in calling for the ball when he got to his spot on the block. He showed off a smooth hook numerous times. He finished with 19 points and 12 rebounds. “Nick’s done a good job of improving every year,” Enfield said. “He knows what it takes to win. He’s got very good touch around the basket. He certainly is our best rebounder and shot blocker and he intends to keep developing on both sides of the ball.”Rakocevic credited his improved play to the time he put in this past offseason. “I was working hard all summer,” Rakocevic said. “Stayed here, didn’t go home, [working on] just every aspect of my game. Just being here, working with the coaches.”The Trojans still shot 50 percent from 3-pointer, despite not getting many open looks.“We have some very good shooters,” Enfield said. “When their feet are set and they’re open. That’s the big thing for us, we want to take open shots, and tonight we didn’t have a ton of open shots from 3.”USC closed the game on a 7-0 run to pull away with the 10-point win. USC was quite fortunate that the 49ers struggled to put the ball in the hoop, as it only shot 36 percent, despite having numerous good looks. Enfield stressed the importance of increasing the defensive intensity moving forward, especially against No. 5 Nevada on Saturday. “The biggest thing is rebounding,” Enfield said. “We play small a lot. It’s one of those things where the guards have to come back in and help.” USC will take on Nevada on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at Galen Center.last_img read more

Wexford clinch last minute equaliser

first_imgWexford equalised with a controversial late free.Tipp manager Shane Ronayne admits they have work to do ahead of the replay.This afternoon it’s the turn of the Tipp minors as they take on Clare in the Munster Minor B final.Throw-in is at 3 o’clock in Bruff, County Limerick. Photo © @TippLadiesFB Tipp and Wexford will face off again in a fortnights time to decide the destination of the Division 3 Ladies Football League title.The sides finished all square following a thrilling game in Clane yesterday.Tipp 12 points Wexford 2-6 the final score in a game which saw the sides level on a number of occasions.last_img

Right stuff: Kenta Maeda has become ‘real weapon’ in relief role for Dodgers

first_img Dodgers rediscover their grind-it-out mojo in NLDS sweep Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw takes nothing for granted as another postseason begins “I think it dates back to – I think it was June when we were juggling through our six starting pitchers and we first put him in the ’pen,” Dodgers GM Farhan Zaidi said of the idea that Maeda might be a valuable piece in the bullpen. “Even in that scenario, he came out and I think the first fastball he threw was 94 (mph). Just seeing that kind of lit the light bulb a little bit that this guy’s stuff might play up in the ’pen.“Once you start talking about a full grade or even more of a velocity uptick we thought it would play pretty well. It’s one thing for the stuff to bump up. It’s another thing for a guy to be able to come into high-leverage situations and be able to execute at a high level. In that sense, he really exceeded expectations and has established himself as a real weapon for us going forward.”The fastball velocity has improved. But Maeda’s main weapon remains his slider, which has had a 22 percent swing-and-miss rate during his two seasons with the Dodgers. As a reliever, he can rely on it more heavily, knowing he won’t be going through the lineup multiple times. In his first two relief appearances of the postseason, he threw his slider slightly more than half of the time.“When you’re talking 90 to 92 (mph) versus 92 to 95 that’s three ticks up in velocity. That’s one component and it just makes his slider play that much more up,” Roberts said. “And his slider is elite. But now when you’ve got to be more conscious of the 94, 95, that just makes the slider even better.”If Maeda continues to be dominant as a setup man, wouldn’t the temptation be to make that his full-time role even beyond this postseason?“We still view him as a starter long-term,” Zaidi said of Maeda, whose heavily incentives-laden contract is structured around bonuses for starts and innings pitched that would be unreachable as a reliever. “This is a specialized situation where we have a shorter rotation. We signed him to be a starting pitcher. He’s had two good years for us in that role.“We’ve had pretty good bullpens. It’s always harder to find starting pitching. And I think that’s how he sees himself.” Right stuff: Kenta Maeda has become ‘real weapon’ in relief role for Dodgers PreviousLos Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda stands in the dugout before Game 1 of the baseball team’s National League Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks in Los Angeles, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Dodger pitcher Kenta Maeda works out at Dodger stadium Thursday evening. The Dodgers will face the Nationals or the Cubs in the NLCS on Saturday. ( Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda (18) stretches against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the eighth inning of game 3 of baseball’s National League Division Series, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda (18) throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the eighth inning of game 3 of baseball’s National League Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda (18) throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the eighth inning of game 3 of baseball’s National League Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the eighth inning of game 3 of baseball’s National League Division Series, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, of Japan, throws Arizona Diamondbacks during the fifth inning of Game 2 of baseball’s National League Division Series in Los Angeles, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, of Japan, throws against Arizona Diamondbacks during the fifth inning of Game 2 of baseball’s National League Division Series in Los Angeles, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 on the mound in the 6th inning. The Los Angeles Dodgers played the Arizona Diamondbacks in game 2 of the National League Division Series. Los Angeles,, CA 10/8/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda throws to the plate during the fifth inning of Game 2 of the NLDS against the Arizona Diamondbacks last weekend. Shorter outings out of the bullpen have played to a lot of Maeda’s strengths. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda, of Japan, throws Arizona Diamondbacks during the fifth inning of Game 2 of baseball’s National League Division Series in Los Angeles, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda #18 on the mound in the 6th inning. The Los Angeles Dodgers played the Arizona Diamondbacks in game 2 of the National League Division Series. Los Angeles,, CA 10/8/2017 (Photo by John McCoy, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Kenta Maeda stands in the dugout before Game 1 of the baseball team’s National League Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks in Los Angeles, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Dodger pitcher Kenta Maeda works out at Dodger stadium Thursday evening. The Dodgers will face the Nationals or the Cubs in the NLCS on Saturday. ( Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 12Dodger pitcher Kenta Maeda works out at Dodger stadium Thursday evening. The Dodgers will face the Nationals or the Cubs in the NLCS on Saturday. ( Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)ExpandLOS ANGELES — The move from starter to reliever is usually a demotion, a sign that you failed in some way, weren’t quite good enough at the first job.For Kenta Maeda this fall, it might be more revelation than devaluation.Sent to the bullpen for the NL Division Series against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Maeda made two appearances, faced six hitters, retired them all and struck out four of them with stuff decidedly more electric than he displayed in two years as a starting pitcher.“You would think most guys, their stuff should play up (in the shorter bursts of a relief role) and in theory it should. But that’s not always the case,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “But Kenta, who’s always been a starter, just having the ability to let it eat for however many pitches we need from him, the stuff has really played up. Execution has really been finite. “To see Kenta in a small sample is very difficult. And obviously to put him against right-handed hitters it makes it that much more tough. To be able to deploy him at a certain spot in the order, it is a huge weapon.”That “certain spot in the order” is the most right-handed spot the Dodgers can find. Maeda faced five right-handed hitters and one lefty (Daniel Descalso) in the NLDS. He struck out four of the righties.That is not surprising. This season, Maeda was one of the more difficult right-handed pitchers for right-handed hitters to face, holding them to a .214 average and striking them out once in every three plate appearances.Only three pitchers in baseball faced at least 250 right-handed hitters this season and posted a higher strikeout rate than Maeda’s 32.6 percent. Two of the three might win Cy Young awards – Nationals ace Max Scherzer (43.9), Red Sox left-hander Chris Sale (37.1) and Indians ace Corey Kluber (36.6).Much less effective against left-handed hitters, a postseason ROOGY was born. Dodgers World Series schedule, game times, TV listings center_img Whicker: Dodgers in World Series: If not now, when? Related Articles Cody Bellinger’s success as Dodgers rookie was a lifetime in the making Dodgers’ Austin Barnes in position for more starts after stellar NLDS performance Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more