The Children Never Had Covid. So Why Did They Have Coronavirus Antibodies?

first_imgThen why do we have a pandemic? Shouldn’t most of us be protected by memory cells left by other coronavirus infections? – Advertisement – Now the researchers are planning to expand their study to monitor thousands of children and adults. Some have antibodies that can block the new coronavirus in lab tests. Others do not.“If they have the pandemic strain, are they protected?” Dr. Kassiotis asked. Will they get sick, he wondered, or will the infection be all but undetectable?Dr. Elledge and his colleagues at Harvard developed their own highly specific, sensitive and exhaustive antibody test, VirScan. It is able to detect a diverse collection of antibodies with that are directed at any of more than 800 places on the new coronavirus, including the antibody that Dr. Kassiotis and his colleagues studied.After examining blood taken from 190 people before the pandemic emerged, Dr. Elledge and his colleagues concluded that many already had antibodies, including the one targeting the base of the spike — presumably from infections with related coronaviruses that cause colds.But while adults might get one or two colds a year, Dr. Elledge said, children may get up to a dozen. As a result, many develop floods of coronavirus antibodies that are present almost continuously; they may lessen cold symptoms, or even leave children with colds that are symptomless but still infectious.While adults may not have detectable coronavirus antibodies, many may be able to quickly make antibodies if they are infected with a coronavirus.In typical viral infections, the immune system pours out antibodies to fight the virus. When the infection is quelled, the antibodies, no longer needed, diminish in number. But the body is left with so-called memory cells that allow antibody production to soar rapidly if the virus tries to invade again. The Coronavirus Outbreak ›Words to Know About TestingConfused by the terms about coronavirus testing? Let us help: In a study published Friday in Science, the group, led by George Kassiotis, who heads the Retroviral Immunology Laboratory at the institute, reports that on average only 5 percent of adults had these antibodies, but 43 percent of children did.Researchers who did not participate in the study were intrigued by the finding. H. Benjamin Larman, an immunologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, called it a “well-done study that puts forward a compelling theory which is supported by their data.” While the tip of the spike is unique to the new coronavirus, the base is found in all coronaviruses, Dr. Kassiotis said. In lab tests, antibodies to the base of the spike prevented the new coronavirus from entering cells in order to reproduce. Stephen J. Elledge, a genetics professor at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, had a similar response. He and others have found many people have antibodies to common colds caused by other coronaviruses; in laboratory studies, these antibodies also block the new coronavirus.- Advertisement –center_img In March, as the pandemic was just beginning, Dr. Kassiotis and his colleagues decided to develop a highly sensitive antibody test. To assess it, they examined blood samples taken before the pandemic from over 300 adults and 48 children and adolescents, comparing them with samples from more than 170 people who had been infected with the new coronavirus.The scientists expected samples taken before the pandemic to have no antibodies that attacked the new coronavirus. Those were to be the controls for the test the scientists were developing.Instead, they found that many children, and some adults, carried one antibody in particular that can prevent coronaviruses, including the new one, from entering cells. This antibody attaches itself to a spike that pokes out of coronaviruses.- Advertisement – “It is quite possible that you lose your memory over time,” Dr. Elledge said. He suspects that the new coronavirus may interfere with the activation of the memory cells able to respond to the infection.An infection “might give you a hazy memory that fades over time,” he said. If so, a very recent infection with a common cold coronavirus would be needed to protect against the new coronavirus, and even then the protection might last only for a limited time.The new coronavirus would have hobbled the production of antibodies that specifically attack it. That might explain why children, with their seemingly continuous colds, are much better off than adults.Dr. Elledge said that if he is right about the loss of memory cells, that bodes well for vaccines. A vaccine boosts antibody production without the presence of a virus. So the virus “is not in the background, messing up memory cell formation,” he said.Another possibility is that most adults actually are protected by memory cells from previous infections with the common cold. Although few have enough antibodies in their blood to protect them at any given time, they may be able to quickly make antibodies to lessen the impact of the new coronavirus.That might explain why many adults who are infected recover quickly.“We focus on those who get really sick, but 95 to 98 percent of those who get the virus don’t have to go to the hospital,” Dr. Elledge said. “There are a lot of people who do get better.” Antibody: A protein produced by the immune system that can recognize and attach precisely to specific kinds of viruses, bacteria, or other invaders.Antibody test/serology test: A test that detects antibodies specific to the coronavirus. Antibodies begin to appear in the blood about a week after the coronavirus has infected the body. Because antibodies take so long to develop, an antibody test can’t reliably diagnose an ongoing infection. But it can identify people who have been exposed to the coronavirus in the past.Antigen test: This test detects bits of coronavirus proteins called antigens. Antigen tests are fast, taking as little as five minutes, but are less accurate than tests that detect genetic material from the virus.Coronavirus: Any virus that belongs to the Orthocoronavirinae family of viruses. The coronavirus that causes Covid-19 is known as SARS-CoV-2. Covid-19: The disease caused by the new coronavirus. The name is short for coronavirus disease 2019.Isolation and quarantine: Isolation is the separation of people who know they are sick with a contagious disease from those who are not sick. Quarantine refers to restricting the movement of people who have been exposed to a virus.Nasopharyngeal swab: A long, flexible stick, tipped with a soft swab, that is inserted deep into the nose to get samples from the space where the nasal cavity meets the throat. Samples for coronavirus tests can also be collected with swabs that do not go as deep into the nose — sometimes called nasal swabs — or oral or throat swabs.Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): Scientists use PCR to make millions of copies of genetic material in a sample. Tests that use PCR enable researchers to detect the coronavirus even when it is scarce.Viral load: The amount of virus in a person’s body. In people infected by the coronavirus, the viral load may peak before they start to show symptoms, if symptoms appear at all. That happened to Dr. Larman and his family of five. Four of them got sick with Covid-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, in July. None were seriously ill, and his 4-year-old son was spared altogether.“My son was not isolated from us and therefore heavily exposed,” Dr. Larman said. “He tested negative twice, and so we certainly suspect that he had some form of pre-existing immunity.” It’s been a big puzzle of the pandemic: Why are children so much less likely than adults to become infected with the new coronavirus and, if infected, less likely to become ill?A possible reason may be that many children already have antibodies to other coronaviruses, according to researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London. About one in five of the colds that plague children are caused by viruses in this family. Antibodies to those viruses may also block SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus causing the pandemic.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Cricket News Indian players wear black armbands as mark of respect to Vajpayee, Wadekar

first_imgNottingham: The Indian cricketers on Saturday wore black arm bands on the first day of the third Test against England here as a mark of respect to former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and ex captain Ajit Wadekar, who passed away earlier this week.Just before the start of the day’s play, the Indian players, led by Virat Kohli, were seen wearing black arm bands in memory of the departed former prime minister and ex skipper.Also Read | Third Test in Nottingham, India struggle after good start from openers “The Indian Cricket Team is wearing black armbands as a mark of respect to former India captain Shri Ajit Wadekar and former India Prime Minister Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee, who passed away recently,” the BCCI tweeted.Wadekar, who passed away on August 15, led India to their first away series victory in West Indies and England in 1971, died in Mumbai on August 15 after a prolonged illness. He was 77.Former PM Vajpayee passed away on August 16. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Update on the latest sports

first_imgUpdate on the latest sports MacDermid has become a regular on the blue line for the Kings this season, getting three goals and five assists in a career-high 45 games. He has scored 13 points with 115 penalty minutes during parts of three seasons with Los Angeles.NHL-STAPLETON OBITEx-Blackhawks blueliner Stapleton diesTORONTO (AP) — Former Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Pat Stapleton has died at 79.The three-time Second Team All-Star was on Canada’s Summit Series squad in 1972 and is alleged to have claimed the puck from Paul Henderson’s series-winning goal over the Soviet Union. He played eight seasons with the Blackhawks from 1956-66 to 1972-73, helping them to Stanley Cup final appearances in 1971 and 1973. — Former University of Georgia standout running back Todd Gurley has formally agreed to a one-year contract with the Falcons, pending a physical. The framework of the deal was agreed to on March 20, less than 24 hours after Gurley was released by the Rams, and finalized this week. He was one of the NFL’s top running backs with the Rams and says he has no doubt he can still meet that standard. — The Cowboys have signed cornerback Saivion Smith, adding the former XFL player about the same time the spring league announced it was suspending operations. Smith played for Houston, which was the only undefeated team in the XFL when the league stopped playing last month after five games because of the new coronavirus outbreak. Smith led Alabama with three interceptions in his only season in 2018.NHL-KINGS-MACDERMIDLA Kings sign MacDermid to 2-year contract extensionLOS ANGELES (AP) — Defenseman Kurtis MacDermid has agreed to a two-year, $1.75 million contract extension through the 2021-22 season with the Los Angeles Kings. NHL-WEBSTER OBITEx-NHL, WHA forward Webster diesUNDATED (AP) — Former NHL and WHA player and head coach Tom Webster has died at 71, according to the Carolina Hurricanes.Webster’s playing career took off once he jumped to the WHA, where he had 220 goals and 425 points in 352 games over six seasons with the New England and Hartford Whalers from 1972-78. He later went on to coach the New York Rangers and Los Angeles Kings.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 — The XFL has suspended operations and laid off its employees. Employees were told of the layoffs Friday during an in-house conference call. The upstart league backed by WWE canceled the remainder of its season last month because of the coronavirus pandemic, but promised to be back in 2021. The moves have left the league’s future in doubt. The XFL has eight franchises and played five games out of a planned 10-game schedule.— Blake Snell, Juan Soto and Bo Bichette are among the baseball stars switching over to PlayStation with America’s pastime on hold. One player from each of the 30 major league teams has signed on to play a round-robin regular season on the MLB The Show video game with the real season on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic. Snell, a Cy Young Award winner with Tampa Bay, will face Cincinnati reliever Amir Garrett in the opener Friday night. That matchup will air on Snell’s Twitch feed, and other games will be streamed via Twitch and YouTube with MLB Network host Robert Flores providing commentary.— New Jersey Devils defenseman P.K. Subban (SOO’-ban) and the NHL are bringing something new to television Saturday for fans dealing with the isolation and hardships caused by the coronavirus outbreak. It’s NHL Hat Trick Trivia. Subban is the host of the weekly 30-minute show in which contestants will answer up to three hockey trivia questions for prizes, the top one being two tickets to any game next season. Everything is filmed remotely with Subban hosting the show from his living room in Los Angeles, in the house he shares with fiancee and Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn. Contestants are filmed at their homes and there is a guest player every week.— Basketball’s Sabrina Ionescu, soccer’s Carli Lloyd and swimming’s Katie Ledecky are among the athletes who will help young girls and women stay mentally and physically fit during the coronavirus pandemic. The Women’s Sports Foundation and Yahoo Sports are launching #WeKeepPlaying, a live-stream event on Saturday at 4 p.m. EDT. They’ll join tennis great Billie Jean King and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in taking questions from young athletes and providing tips on resilience and training. Sports broadcaster Cari Champion will moderate the hour discussion, streamed on YahooSports.com.— The defending soccer champions in Belarus have started putting mannequins in the stands as fans stay away from stadiums because of the coronavirus. Dynamo Brest has been selling “virtual tickets” to games. Those give foreign fans the right to have a mannequin with a cut-out photo attached. It comes as fans at many clubs have said they will boycott games because the virus makes going to the stadium too risky. Keeping sports arenas open has been part of Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko’s unconventional approach to the coronavirus. He has said there is no need to close workplaces and public events. April 10, 2020 Garza has announced he’ll enter the draft process without an agent so he can maintain his college eligibility. The All-America center was runner-up to Dayton’s Obi Toppin (OH’-bee TAH’-pihn) for Associated Press national player of the year after becoming the first Big Ten player in 26 years to average at least 26 points per game in conference play.Garza scored a school-record 740 points this season, breaking the program’s 50-year old record.Carey Jr. is entering the NBA draft after being named the ACC’s player of the year and newcomer of the year by The Associated Press. He had been considered a likely one-and-done prospect and projected first-round pick.Carey averaged team highs of 17.8 points, 8.8 rebounds and 1.6 blocks while shooting 57.7% as a physical inside presence.Creighton guard Ty-Shon Alexander declared for the draft with the option to return to school for his final season of eligibility. Alexander was named to the All-Big East first team after leading the Bluejays with 16.9 points per game. He said Friday he would go through the evaluation process by league executives to determine if he should stay in the June 25 draft or withdrawal by the May 29 deadline.center_img Josh Green is the latest Arizona freshman to declare for the draft, joining Nico Mannion and Zeke Nnaji in leaving early. The Australian-born Green is projected to be a first-round pick after averaging 12 points, 4.6 rebounds and 2.6 assists during his lone season with the Wildcats. The athletic, 6-foot-6 guard grew up in Sydney before his family moved to Phoenix.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTSNationals report 1 positive test, not a playerUNDATED (AP) — Washington Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo says a non-playing team employee tested positive for the coronavirus and is “on the road to getting better.”Rizzo says no players for the reigning World Series champions have shown any symptoms of COVID-19 at any point and so no one has been tested. He said the team’s medical staff checks in each day with every player and staff member. Associated Press Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditCOLLEGE BASKETBALL-IOWA-GARZAIowa’s Garza enters draft, keeps college eligibility for nowUNDATED (AP) — Iowa’s Luka Garza and Duke’s Vernon Carey Jr. head the latest cluster of college basketball players who are testing their potential value in the upcoming NBA draft. NFL-NEWSReport: Brees to join NBC after playing career endsUNDATED (AP) — The New York Post is reporting that New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (breez) will join NBC after he retires.The 41-year old Brees will be going into his 20th NFL season this year and is signed through 2021. He is expected to begin as an analyst on Notre Dame games and in the studio for “Football Night in America” before eventually moving into the “Sunday Night Football” booth.In other NFL news: Rizzo said the ailing employee was at the team’s spring training facility in West Palm Beach, Florida, and now is home after his quarantine ended. Rizzo said the employee is fever-free and symptom-free.In other news related to the coronavirus pandemic:— The chief executive of the Tokyo Games says he can’t guarantee the postponed Olympics will be staged next year because the coronavirus continues to spread in Japan. The country issued an emergency declaration this week to battle the virus. Organizing committee CEO Toshiro Muto says “I don’t think anyone would be able to say if it is going to be possible to get it under control by next July or not. We certainly are not in a position to give you a clear answer.” The Olympics were postponed last month with a new opening set for July 23, 2021, followed by the Paralympics on Aug. 24.— The U.S. Olympic swimming trials have been rescheduled for June 13-20, 2021 in Omaha, Nebraska. The trials were initially scheduled for June 21-28 and are the sole qualifier for U.S. Olympic team, with the top two finishers in each event earning a trip to Tokyo. The original 15-session, eight-day schedule will remain for the rescheduled trials.— Florida State offensive lineman Andrew Boselli says he and his famous father are both recovering from COVID-19. The son of former NFL lineman Tony Boselli writes on Florida State’s athletic department website that he dealt with the worst of the virus for about three days. The Seminoles lineman wrote he “spent days feeling miserable” and his healthy 47-year-old father with no underlying health conditions “spent three days in the intensive care unit.” Tony Boselli is now back home.last_img read more

Help wanted: Detention Officer for Sumner County Sheriff Office

first_imgHelp wanted: Detention Officer I – Sheriff Office.Pay range: $11.64 – $19.10.HS diploma or GED.  Position processes inmates through detention facility.  Maintains security of inmates in facility and during transport.  Prepares reports and maintains records.  Candidate must pass a Criminal History background check.  Must have a valid KS driver’s license.Apply on line at www.HRePartners.com.  Application closing date 07/17/2016.  Complete job description available at Sumner Co. Clerk’s Office, 501 N. Washington, Rm 101, Wellington Ks 67152, ph 620-326-3395. EOElast_img